Clinical trials located in

Poznań

Poznań city is located in Poland. Currently, 20 clinical trials are being conducted in this city.

Poznań, located in west-central Poland, is a city steeped in history and culture. It is believed to be one of the oldest cities in Poland, with roots tracing back to the 10th century. Poznań played a pivotal role in Poland’s early history, including the baptism of Poland’s first ruler, Mieszko I. The city is renowned for its Renaissance-style Old Town, including the colorful Poznań Town Hall which houses the Historical Museum of Poznań. Another highlight is the island of Ostrów Tumski, which is considered the cradle of the Polish state. Poznań is also famous for its St. Martin’s croissants, a local delicacy.

  • 2019/ABM/01/00024

    Rituximab treatment for children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome

    This clinical trial focuses on idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS), a kidney disorder causing excessive protein loss in the urine, leading to swelling and other complications. The study aims to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of rituximab for children aged 24 months to 16 years with steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome (SDNS) or frequently relapsing nephrotic syndrome (FRNS).

    Participants will be randomly assigned to receive either rituximab or a placebo during a double-blind phase lasting up to 365 days. Following this period, all participants will receive rituximab in an open-label extension phase. The study will monitor the time to the first relapse, assess disease progression, and observe any adverse effects. Regular health assessments, including physical exams, blood tests, and monitoring of disease progression, will be conducted throughout the trial to ensure the safety and well-being of the participants. The goal is to determine if rituximab can extend the period of remission and reduce the frequency of relapses in children with INS.

    • rituximab
    • placebo
  • Evaluating a dual anticoagulant therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation and acute coronary syndrome after percutaneous coronary intervention

    This study focuses on patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who have undergone a procedure called percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The therapy being tested involves a combination of drugs to prevent blood clots and manage heart health after PCI.

    Patients with both AF and ACS face a challenge: preventing clots while avoiding excessive bleeding. Standard practice often includes three drugs: an oral anticoagulant (OAC) to prevent stroke, aspirin, and clopidogrel. However, using all three drugs together can lead to a high risk of bleeding within a year.

    The study aims to find out if using just two drugs—dabigatran and ticagrelor—can be as safe and effective as the standard three-drug therapy. This approach is called a dual anticoagulant regimen. Participants in the study will be men and women aged 18 and older who have nonvalvular AF and have successfully undergone PCI for ACS. They will be randomly assigned to one of two groups: one group will receive dabigatran and ticagrelor, while the other group will receive dabigatran, clopidogrel, and aspirin. The treatment will last for 12 months.

    The main goal of the study is to see if the dual therapy is as good as the triple therapy in preventing major bleeding and cardiovascular events like heart attacks and strokes. The study also looks at other outcomes, such as death and the need for additional heart procedures. This research will provide important information about a new treatment strategy that could improve safety and effectiveness for patients with AF and ACS who undergo PCI.

    • Ticagrelor
    • clopidogrel
    • Dabigatran
    • Aspirin
  • To evaluate a combination of 3 different drugs versus 2 other drugs in the treatment of patients with melanoma

    This study compares two different approaches to treating advanced melanoma, a type of skin cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. This study is specifically aimed at patients with a gene mutation called BRAF who have previously received treatment with drugs such as nivolumab or pembrolizumab.

    One therapeutic approach involves taking three study drugs: pembrolizumab administered intravenously every 3 weeks, along with encorafenib and binimetinib taken orally daily at home. The second approach involves taking two study drugs: ipilimumab and nivolumab administered intravenously every 3 weeks for the first 4 doses, followed by nivolumab alone every 4 weeks. Both treatments will last for approximately 2 years, but there is no time limit for treatment with encorafenib and binimetinib.

    The research team will closely monitor the patients’ health during regular clinic visits to see how they are responding to treatment. The main goal is to determine which treatment method is more effective in shrinking or eliminating melanoma tumors.

    • Nivolumab
    • Ipilimumab
    • Binimetinib
    • Encorafenib
    • Pembrolizumab
  • Study assessing the effectiveness of Tebentafusp administered alone and in combination with Pembrolizumab in the treatment of advanced melanoma

    The aim of this study is to test new treatments for people with advanced skin melanoma that does not respond well to other therapies. The main focus was on a new experimental drug called tebentafusp, which is a special type of protein that helps the body’s immune system recognize and attack cancer cells.

    The study divided patients into three different groups. One group will receive tebentafusp alone. Another group will receive tebentafusp in combination with another immunotherapy drug called pembrolizumab. The third group will receive the treatment that the doctor thinks is best for the patient – this could be another experimental drug, standard therapy, or simply supportive care.

    Scientists are primarily focusing on the effectiveness of these treatments in shrinking tumors and extending patient survival. They will also monitor closely for any side effects to make sure the treatment is safe. The study is expected to last about two years and will include frequent check-ins to monitor patient responses.

    • Tebentafusp
    • Pembrolizumab
  • Study on combining two drugs – Fianlimab and Cemiplimab in patients with previously untreated melanoma

    This study examines two drugs, fianlimab and cemiplimab, given together for the treatment of melanoma. The main goal is to see how effective this drug combination is in treating melanoma compared with pembrolizumab, which is already approved for the treatment of melanoma in adults. The study will also look at whether there are any differences in the effects of these experimental drugs in adolescents and adults.

    Scientists also want to learn about other key issues: what side effects may occur from taking these experimental drugs, how much of the drugs enter the bloodstream over time, and whether the body produces antibodies to the drugs that could make them less effective or cause side effects. They will also check whether taking medications improves patients’ quality of life. Fianlimab and cemiplimab will be administered by intravenous infusion, and pembrolizumab will be administered by intravenous infusion.

    • placebo
    • Fianlimab
    • Cemiplimab
    • Pembrolizumab
  • Efficacy and safety study of rosnilimab in moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis

    This study will evaluate the effectiveness and safety of Rosnilimab in patients with moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis. Rosnilimab is an antibody that activates the PD-1 receptor, also known as ANB030. Patients will be randomly assigned to receive Rosnilimab or placebo.

    The main aim of the study is to assess changes in the 28-Joint Disease Activity Index based on the concentration of C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) after 12 weeks of treatment. DAS28-CRP is a validated tool that assesses disease activity based on the number of painful and swollen joints and the concentration of C-reactive protein in the blood. A reduction in DAS28-CRP indicates an improvement in the patient’s condition.

    This study aims to test whether Rosnilimab is effective and safe in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. If the results are promising, this drug could become a new treatment option for patients suffering from this disease.

    • placebo
    • Rosnilimab
  • Study of the safety of Imvotamab in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    This test is for people with moderate or severe rheumatoid arthritis who has not improved with previous treatment. The main goal is to test the safety and tolerance of the body to a new drug called Imvotamab.

    In this study, participants will receive Imvotamab or a placebo directly into their veins. A placebo looks like a drug but contains no active drug. This method helps to understand the effects of Imvotamab by comparing it with a placebo. The study was carefully designed to monitor the effects of the drug, including any side effects and side effects that participants may experience. Of particular interest is the body’s response to the drug and the behavior of the drug in the body over time.

    This study is being conducted at multiple sites and involves approximately 24 participants. Each participant will participate in the study for a maximum of 52 weeks. During this time, their health and any changes in symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis will be closely monitored.

    Participating in this study could potentially provide new insight into an individual’s condition and contribute to the development of new treatments for rheumatoid arthritis. Participation in the study is voluntary, and all necessary information will be provided to enable you to make an informed decision about joining the study.

    • Imvotamab
    • placebo
  • Evaluating SAR441566 in Adults with Moderate-to-Severe Rheumatoid Arthritis

    This clinical trial is designed to explore the effectiveness and safety of a new medication called SAR441566 in adults who are dealing with moderate-to-severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA). If you’re an adult who hasn’t found relief from RA with methotrexate alone and haven’t tried biologic or targeted synthetic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs yet, this study might be of interest to you.

    The study is set up as a double-blind, placebo-controlled experiment, which means neither you nor the study team will know if you’re receiving the actual medication or a placebo. This is a key part of ensuring the results are unbiased. You’ll be randomly placed into one of five groups, with some receiving SAR441566 and others a placebo, all alongside your regular methotrexate treatment.

    The trial will last for about 149 days, including a 6-week period before the treatment starts to confirm your eligibility, a 12-week treatment phase, and a 2-week follow-up period after treatment ends to monitor your safety. Throughout the study, you’ll visit the study center 8 times.

    One of the main goals of this study is to see if participants show a significant improvement in their RA symptoms, specifically looking for a 20% improvement in the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) score by week 12. This score measures various aspects of RA, including joint tenderness and swelling, pain levels, and overall physical function.

    By participating, you’ll be contributing to research that could lead to new treatment options for RA, potentially offering relief to many who are searching for more effective therapies.

    • SAR441566
    • placebo
  • Study of the effectiveness of CPL409116 in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    A clinical trial is being presented that focuses on evaluating the efficacy and safety of a new drug called CPL409116 in individuals with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who have not achieved improvement with methotrexate alone. The study is designed to last for 12 weeks and aims to enroll approximately 100 participants, who will be divided into four groups. Each group will receive different doses of CPL409116 or a placebo, in addition to their continued methotrexate treatment.

    CPL409116 is a promising drug that works by targeting specific pathways in the body known to contribute to inflammation and RA symptoms. By inhibiting these pathways, CPL409116 could potentially reduce disease activity and improve symptoms. The main objective of this study is to determine how well CPL409116 can decrease disease activity compared to a placebo, which will be measured using the DAS28(CRP) score. This score takes into account the number of swollen or tender joints, the level of a specific protein in the blood that indicates inflammation, and how the patient assesses their disease activity.

    Participants in this study will be randomly assigned to one of the treatment groups and will take the study drug or placebo twice daily for 85 consecutive days. It is important for participants to have been on a stable dose of methotrexate for at least 12 weeks prior to joining the study, with no dosage changes for at least 8 weeks before the study begins.

    This study aims not only to evaluate the efficacy of CPL409116 but also its safety, ensuring that it is well-tolerated by participants. If someone is struggling with active rheumatoid arthritis and has not achieved an adequate response to methotrexate, this study may provide an opportunity to access a potentially new treatment option while contributing to significant research that could benefit other individuals with RA in the future.

    • CPL409116
    • placebo
  • Long-term safety study of efgartigimod in the treatment of primary Sjögren’s syndrome

    The study focuses on examining the medication efgartigimod and its potential to assist adults with Primary Sjögren’s Syndrome (pSS). Participants who have taken part in previous efgartigimod studies may qualify for this extension study. The primary aim is to assess the long-term safety of efgartigimod for individuals with pSS.

    During the 48-week duration of the study, participants will receive efgartigimod treatment. It’s important to understand that individuals from both the active and placebo groups of previous studies can participate, but they will not be informed of their previous group assignment. The researchers will closely monitor any side effects, including serious ones, as well as any changes in participants’ laboratory test results or vital signs throughout the study.

    This study offers an opportunity to further investigate the potential benefits of efgartigimod in managing pSS, particularly in reducing IgG autoantibodies, which are thought to contribute to the disease. Participation in the study could provide valuable insights into the long-term safety of this treatment.

    • Efgartigimod
  • Comparison of zibotentan/dapagliflozin with dapagliflozin alone in the treatment of chronic kidney disease with high proteinuria

    The study aims to understand how to better treat people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and high proteinuria. This study is in its third phase and involves multiple centers where participants will be closely monitored. The main goal is to compare the effectiveness, safety, and how well participants tolerate a combination treatment of zibotentan/dapagliflozin versus dapagliflozin alone.

    During this study, participants will be randomly assigned to one of two groups. One group will receive the combination of zibotentan and dapagliflozin, while the other group will receive only dapagliflozin. Both treatments aim to slow down the decline in kidney function, which is a major concern for people with CKD and high proteinuria. The key measure of success for this study is the change in eGFR from baseline, which is a test used to check how well the kidneys are working, specifically by measuring the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). This will be assessed at the 24-month mark of the study.

    This research is crucial because it could lead to better treatment options for those suffering from CKD and high proteinuria, potentially improving their quality of life and health outcomes.

    • Zibotentan/Dapagliflozin
    • Dapagliflozin
  • ARTEMIS study: Protecting kidney health in heart surgery patients with Ravulizumab

    The ARTEMIS study aims to find a new way to protect people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) undergoing heart surgery requiring the use of a heart-lung machine, also known as cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The main aim of this study is to see if a single dose of a drug called ravulizumab given intravenously can reduce the risk of serious kidney problems after surgery, compared with a placebo. Kidney issues are grouped under serious adverse events, and investigators will monitor them for up to 90 days after surgery. The study is carefully controlled and participants will not know whether they are receiving ravulizumab or a placebo to ensure the results are unbiased. This is an important test for people with chronic kidney disease undergoing heart surgery because it may lead to better outcomes and a lower risk of kidney damage after surgery.

    • placebo
    • Ravulizumab
  • Studying rilzabrutinib for chronic immune thrombocytopenia

    The research is underway to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a medication called rilzabrutinib in adults and teenagers with Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP), a chronic blood condition characterized by a low platelet count. Participants will receive either the medication or a placebo twice daily over a period of about a year and a half. Platelet levels, overall health, and quality of life will be measured before and during the study to gather comprehensive data.

    • Rilzabrutinib
  • Ceralasertib & durvalumab vs docetaxel in advanced lung cancer study

    This is an open-label study titled LATIFY, which means everyone will know the type of treatment they are receiving. The study team is looking into a specific type of lung cancer, called Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) which did not get better after previous treatments. Two treatments will be tested, a new combination of ceralasertib plus durvalumab, compared to a commonly used treatment, docetaxel. Doctors will track participants’ health over time to see which treatment helps people live longer. Understanding the results will help doctors responsibly give the best treatment for patients with this type of lung cancer.

    • Ceralasertib
    • Durvalumab
    • Docetaxel
  • Exploring treatment options for newly diagnosed Multiple Myeloma

    This clinical trial investigates two treatment paths for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients who are not planned for stem cell transplant initially. The first group receives a combination of bortezomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone (VRd) followed by cilta-cel, an innovative therapy. The second group receives VRd followed by continued treatment with lenalidomide and dexamethasone (Rd). The study evaluates the effectiveness of these treatments by monitoring disease progression, treatment response, and patient survival rates. It also assesses the safety and side effects of the treatments, aiming to improve the quality of life and outcomes for patients with multiple myeloma. The trial’s objective is to provide valuable data on the potential benefits of integrating cilta-cel in the treatment regimen, compared to the more traditional approach, offering insights for better management of this challenging cancer.

    • Cilta-cel
    • Fludarabine
    • Lenalidomide
    • Dexamethasone
    • Cyclophosphamide
    • Bortezomib
  • Comparing sotorasib and pembrolizumab in treating advanced nonsquamous non-small cell lung cancer

    This trial is testing two first-line therapies in people with advanced lung cancer. Two drugs, Sotorasib and Pembrolizumab, are compared, each combined with a special type of chemotherapy known as a “platinum doublet.” The goal is to determine which combination of these two treatments works most effectively in slowing the growth of the cancer or extending the patient’s life. Patients are selected based on the type and stage of lung cancer. The trial is considered appropriate for people with advanced stage IIIB, IIIC or IV non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer. Additionally, the test is intended for people whose cancer cells show a specific response, including no response to PD-L1, but a positive response to KRAS p. G12C.

    • Sotorasib
    • Pembrolizumab
  • Comparison study of two melanoma treatments containing pembrolizumab

    This study compares two treatments for a type of skin cancer known as high-risk melanoma. Participants of this study have previously had this cancer surgically removed. The tested treatments are pembrolizumab with vibostolimab, and pembrolizumab alone. The aim is to find out which treatment is better at preventing the melanoma from returning or spreading to other parts of the body. Even after a successful surgery, some cancer cells may be left behind which could result in the cancer returning. The study is measuring the time it takes for the cancer to return and the time it takes for the cancer to spread far from where it started.

    • Vibostolimab
    • Pembrolizumab
  • Examining povorcitinib for treating hidradenitis suppurativa

    This study is about a drug called Povorcitinib, also known as INCB054707. It’s being tested on people who have moderate to severe Hidradenitis Suppurativa (HS), a painful skin condition. The trial will last for 12 weeks, and then there will be an extension period of 42 weeks. The aim of the trial is to see whether the drug is both safe, and effective enough to reduce the symptoms by at least 50%, without increasing certain symptoms like abscesses or tunnels formed by the disease. The study will also look at whether the drug significantly reduces skin pain and improves quality of life.

    • povorcitinib
  • Study on the benefits of combined therapy for high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    This research study is focused on investigating the safety and effectiveness of a medication called Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) when combined with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) treatment in individuals with high-risk bladder cancer that has not spread to the muscle. The study involves two groups of patients: those who have not responded well to BCG alone and those who have not received BCG previously. For the first group, the primary objective is to determine if the combination of Pembrolizumab and BCG is more effective than BCG alone in eliminating their cancer. For the second group, the goal is to assess whether the combination therapy improves the likelihood of survival without any cancer-related events compared to BCG alone.

    • Bacillus Calmette-Guerin/BCG
    • Pembrolizumab
  • Testing new treatments for non-small cell lung cancer

    This international study aims to assess the effectiveness and safety of various specialized treatments for individuals with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The study focuses on a multiple targeted therapies and immunotherapy. It aims to assess the treatments’ effectiveness and safety, tailored based on specific genetic markers in the patients’ tumors. The approach is personalized, hoping to improve outcomes by matching the right treatment to the right patient, based on their unique cancer profile.

    • Divarasib/GDC-6036
    • Alectinib
    • Entrectinib
    • Cobimetinib
    • Vemurafenib
    • Bevacizumab
    • Atezolizumab
    • Gemcitabine
    • Pemetrexed
    • Cisplatin
    • Carboplatin
    • Docetaxel

See more clinical trials in other cities in Poland:

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