Clinical trials located in

Valencia

Valencia city is located in Spain. Currently, 20 clinical trials are being conducted in this city.

Valencia, Spain’s third-largest city, is renowned for its rich history, vibrant culture, and innovative spirit. Founded in 138 BC, it boasts a blend of Gothic, Baroque, and modernist architecture, exemplified by the futuristic City of Arts and Sciences. Valencia is the birthplace of paella, reflecting its culinary prowess. The Turia Gardens, a transformed riverbed, offers extensive green spaces in the urban heart. The city also celebrates the unique Falles festival, a UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage, showcasing elaborate firework displays and intricate paper-mâché sculptures.

  • CT-EU-00120420

    Testing Tislelizumab and Spartalizumab for Various Cancers with High PD1 Levels

    This study focuses on the treatment of various types of cancer, including colorectal cancer, melanoma, anal carcinoma, mesothelioma, triple-negative breast cancer, lung adenocarcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma, cervical carcinoma, kidney clear cell carcinoma, stomach adenocarcinoma, esophageal adenocarcinoma, uterine adenocarcinoma, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, sarcoma, lung squamous cell carcinoma, urothelial carcinoma, thyroid carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, uveal melanoma, HER2-positive breast cancer, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, squamous esophageal carcinoma, epithelial ovarian cancer, uterine carcinosarcoma, small cell lung cancer, hormone receptor positive/HER2-negative breast cancer, lung adenocarcinoma with EGFR mutation or ALK translocation, colorectal adenocarcinoma, prostate adenocarcinoma, carcinoma of unknown primary, and other histologies.

    The therapy involves two drugs: Spartalizumab and Tislelizumab. Spartalizumab is administered at a dose of 400 mg intravenously every 28 days, while Tislelizumab is administered at a dose of 300mg intravenously every 28 days.

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of these drugs in patients with tumors that express high levels of a protein called PD1 or lower levels in which PD1/PD-L1 inhibitors have been previously established to be effective. PD1 is a protein found on the surface of cells that helps keep the body’s immune responses in check and blocks cancer-fighting immune cells.

    The study is divided into three groups, called cohorts. Patients will first sign a consent form to allow a molecular test to determine the PD1 levels of their tumor. Patients with high PD1-expressing tumors will be placed into cohort 1 or cohort 3. Those with low PD1-expressing tumors, where the effectiveness of similar treatments has been previously established, will be placed into cohort 2.

    – Cohort 1 will receive Spartalizumab as monotherapy (single drug treatment).
    – Cohort 2, consisting of patients with PD1-low tumors, will also receive Spartalizumab as monotherapy.
    – Cohort 3 will receive Tislelizumab as monotherapy.

    Frequent evaluations will be conducted to monitor the patient’s response to the treatment. Participants will receive the drugs intravenously (through a vein) every 28 days and will be closely observed for any improvements or potential side effects.

    • Spartalizumab
    • Tislelizumab
  • Combining immunotherapy and chemoradiotherapy for Anal Cancer treatment


    Anal carcinoma, specifically squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal, will be the focus of this study. Patients who have not previously received treatment for this type of cancer and are candidates for combined chemotherapy and radiation treatment will participate. This study will examine the effectiveness of adding immunotherapy drugs, Atezolizumab and Tiragolumab, to standard chemoradiotherapy. These drugs help the body’s immune system recognize and attack cancer cells. The main objective is to determine if this combination can achieve a complete response, meaning the cancer completely disappears according to certain medical evaluations.

    Throughout the study, patients will first receive two cycles of Atezolizumab and Tiragolumab along with chemoradiotherapy, which includes the chemotherapy drugs Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil, and a specific schedule of radiation therapy. After this initial phase, they will continue with Atezolizumab and Tiragolumab for an additional 24 weeks during a consolidation phase.

    Safety, the effectiveness of treatment, patients’ quality of life, and certain molecular biomarkers in the cancer and blood will be closely monitored throughout the study. Patients can stop the treatment if there are risks of progression, serious side effects, or based on decisions made by themselves or their doctors.

    This study hopes to provide greater insight into whether combining these immunotherapy drugs with standard treatment can improve outcomes for patients with localized squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal.

    • Atezolizumab plus Tiraglolumab
  • Study of Elafibranor in the treatment of adult patients with Primary Biliary Cholangitis (PBC)

    The clinical trial is aimed at adult patients with confirmed primary cholangitis (PBC). Patients with this condition have an inadequate response or intolerance to ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a drug used to treat PBC.

    Primary cholangitis is a disease that slowly progresses and leads to damage to the bile ducts in the liver. This causes a build-up of bile acids, which further damages the liver. As the disease progresses, scarring of the liver may develop (cirrhosis). PBC is also associated with numerous symptoms, such as itching and fatigue, and may lead to the need for a liver transplant.

    The study evaluates the effectiveness and safety of a drug called elafibranor at a dose of 80 mg daily. The study will compare elafibranor with a placebo, an inactive substance administered for control purposes. The main goal of the study is to test the effectiveness of elafibranor. The safety of long-term use of this medicine and its effect on symptoms such as itching and fatigue will also be checked.

    • Elafibranor
  • Study on the effectiveness and safety of M281 in adults with warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    The study focuses on Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (wAIHA), a condition where the immune system mistakenly destroys red blood cells. This leads to symptoms like fatigue, weakness, and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes). The trial examines the effects of a therapy named M281 (Nipocalimab). The purpose of the study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of M281. Patients participating in the study will receive either M281 or a placebo. It aims to compare improvements in health and monitor any side effects.

    The study structure is as follows:

    Double-blind period: This lasts for 24 weeks, where participants will be randomly assigned to one of three groups. One group will receive M281 every 4 weeks, alternating with a placebo every 4 weeks. Another group will receive M281 every 2 weeks, and the third group will receive a placebo every 2 weeks.

    Open-label extension period: This phase extends for 144 weeks, where all participants will receive M281, either every 2 weeks or every 4 weeks.

    Participants will be monitored for 8 weeks after the last dose to check for any ongoing effects of the treatment. The study aims to provide comprehensive information about the effectiveness and safety of M281 in treating wAIHA.

    • M281
    • placebo
  • Comparison of Olorofim and AmBisome® for Treating Invasive Aspergillosis in Patients Who Cannot Use Azole Therapy

    This study focuses on patients dealing with a serious fungal infection called Invasive Aspergillosis (IA). This infection is known to be particularly dangerous for people with weakened immune systems. Two drugs will be compared in this study: Olorofim (also known as F901318) and AmBisome® (liposomal amphotericin B). These drugs are used to treat patients who have a confirmed or suspected IA infection.

    AmBisome® is an established treatment, while Olorofim is a newer medication that works differently. This new drug aims to provide an alternative for patients who don’t respond well to existing therapies.

    The purpose of this study is to compare the effectiveness and safety of Olorofim with AmBisome®, followed by standard care according to medical guidelines. Patients will receive one of the treatments, and their response will be monitored over several months.

    Patients will start with either Olorofim or AmBisome® for a set period, then switch to the standard care recommended by their doctors. This approach allows researchers to understand how well each treatment works and what side effects might occur.

    Participation includes regular follow-ups and assessments to monitor the patient’s health, response to the medication, and any potential side effects. The ultimate goal is to find the best possible treatment for IA, improving outcomes for patients affected by this serious fungal infection.

    • AmBisome®
    • olorofim
  • Evaluating upadacitinib and tocilizumab in pediatric and adolescent patients with active systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    This clinical trial is designed for pediatric and adolescent participants aged 1 to less than 18 years with systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (sJIA). The study aims to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of upadacitinib, an oral medication, and includes a reference arm for tocilizumab, which can be administered subcutaneously or intravenously.

    Participants will be assigned to one of two cohorts. Cohort 1 (group) will receive either upadacitinib or tocilizumab, while Cohort 2 will receive upadacitinib only. The treatment period will last 52 weeks, followed by a 30-day follow-up. The study will monitor changes in disease activity and adverse events through regular visits and assessments.

    • Tocilizumab
    • Upadacitinib
  • Evaluating the pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of Filgotinib in children and teenagers with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    This clinical trial focuses on children and teenagers aged 8 to less than 18 years who have Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA). The study aims to evaluate the pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of filgotinib, an oral medication.

    Participants will be divided into three groups based on their body weight and will receive different doses of filgotinib in the form of film-coated tablets taken once daily. The trial will monitor the maximum concentration of the drug in the blood, the area under the concentration-time curve, and any adverse events over a period of up to 96 weeks.

    • Filgotinib
  • Baricitinib study in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    This clinical trial is designed to test whether Baricitinib is safe and effective in the treatment of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis in children aged 1 to 18 years. Participants will be assigned to one of two groups. In the first group, some participants will receive Baricitinib and others Tocilizumab as the reference drug. In the second group, all participants will receive Baricitinib.

    The primary objective of the study is to evaluate the percentage of participants who experience at least a 30% improvement in disease symptoms after 12 weeks of treatment according to the modified American College of Rheumatology Pediatric Response Criteria (PediACR30). Baricitinib is administered orally and Tocilizumab is administered by subcutaneous injection.

    • Tocilizumab
    • baricitinib
  • Study of sarilumab in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis in children and adolescents

    This is a trial that aims to find the right dose of a drug called sarilumab for treating children and teenagers aged 1 to 17 years old with Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis. Sarilumab is given as an injection under the skin. The main goal is to understand how the body processes this drug in young patients, so they can receive an adequate dose for treating their condition.

    The study will last for about 166 weeks, which is a little over 3 years. It starts with a 4-week screening period, followed by a 12-week treatment phase where the patients will receive repeated doses of sarilumab. After that, there is a 144-week extension phase where the patients can continue receiving the drug, and finally a 6-week follow-up period.

    During the first 12 weeks, the researchers will closely monitor the levels of sarilumab in the patients’ blood to understand how their bodies handle the drug. They will look at the maximum concentration reached, the total amount of drug exposure over time, and the levels just before each new dose. This information will help them determine the right dose and dosing schedule for children and adolescents with Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    In addition to studying the drug levels, the researchers will also evaluate the effectiveness of sarilumab in reducing the symptoms of this condition and monitor any potential side effects to ensure the drug is safe for long-term use in this age group.

    • Sarilumab
  • Study of ustekinumab and guselkumab in young patients with juvenile psoriatic arthritis

    This here clinical trial is aimin’ to study two different medicines, ustekinumab and guselkumab, for treatin’ a condition called juvenile psoriatic arthritis. This is a type of arthritis that affects young’uns and causes joint pain, swellin’, and stiffness.

    The study will have two groups, one group takin’ ustekinumab and the other takin’ guselkumab. These medicines work by targetin’ certain proteins in the body that cause inflammation, which is the root cause of the arthritis symptoms.

    The main goal of the study is to see how well these medicines work in reducin’ the symptoms of juvenile psoriatic arthritis, like joint pain and swellin’. The study will also look at how the body handles these medicines and if they cause any side effects.

    The study will last for about a year and a half, with regular check-ups and assessments to monitor the participants’ progress.

    • Ustekinumab
    • Guselkumab
  • Study of Apremilast in the treatment of oral ulcers in children with Behçet’s syndrome or juvenile arthritis associated with psoriasis

    This study is investigating a drug called Apremilast, which comes as oral tablets or a liquid suspension. The main aim of this study is to investigate the long-term safety of apremilast in children and young people suffering from two different diseases: Juvenile psoriatic arthritis and Behçet’s disease.

    For young children aged 2 years or older, researchers will test whether Apremilast is safe to treat mouth ulcers related to a condition called Behçet’s disease. However, in older children from 5 years of age, it will be checked whether Apremilast is safe in the treatment of active juvenile psoriatic arthritis.

    This study is called a “long-term extension” study. This means that participants have already completed one of two previous studies of apremilast and are now invited to continue taking the drug for another 4 years. During this time, researchers will closely monitor any adverse events and side effects that participants may experience.

    They will also monitor other important health indicators such as changes in weight, height, body mass index, vital signs such as blood pressure and heart rate, as well as any significant changes in routine laboratory tests of blood and urine samples.

    The aim of this study is to collect key long-term safety data on the use of apremilast in the treatment of oral ulcers in Behçet’s disease and juvenile psoriatic arthritis in children and young adults. Scientists want to make sure the drug will be safe for long-term use in young patients before it can be approved to treat these conditions.

    • Apremilast
  • Study of Adalimumab and Risankizumab in the treatment of juvenile psoriatic arthritis in children

    This clinical trial is evaluating the safety and effectiveness of Risankizumab in the treatment of juvenile arthritis with psoriasis in children. It is a type of arthritis in which the immune system attacks healthy cells and tissues, causing pain, stiffness and swelling in the joints.

    About 40 young participants with juvenile psoriatic arthritis will be randomized to receive Risankizumab or the already approved treatment Adalimumab. Participants will receive medications in the form of subcutaneous injections for 24 weeks. Those who find the treatment effective will continue for another 100 weeks.

    During the study, participants will regularly visit a hospital or clinic where they will undergo medical tests, blood tests, check for side effects and complete questionnaires. This allows us to assess the effectiveness and safety of risankizumab in the treatment of juvenile psoriatic arthritis in children.

    • Risankizumab
    • Adalimumab
  • Study of Pembrolizumab/Quavonlimab Combination vs Other Treatments for Colorectal Cancer

    This here clinical trial is aimin’ to take a good look at a new combination treatment called co-formulated pembrolizumab/quavonlimab for folks with stage IV colorectal cancer that’s got that microsatellite instability-high or mismatch repair deficient business goin’ on. The main goal is to see how well this new combo treatment works at shrinkin’ them tumors, compared to some other treatments out there.

    Now, the real important part is that the doctors’ll be keepin’ a close eye on how many folks get what they call an objective response, meanin’ their tumors either disappear completely or shrink down by at least 30%. They’ll be trackin’ this over a span of up to around 50 months to get a good picture of how effective this new treatment is.

    Safety’s always a top priority too, so the doctors’ll be watchin’ out for any side effects or issues that might crop up with this new combo treatment. It’s all about findin’ the best way to fight that cancer while keepin’ folks as comfortable as possible.

  • To evaluate a combination of 3 different drugs versus 2 other drugs in the treatment of patients with melanoma

    This study compares two different approaches to treating advanced melanoma, a type of skin cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. This study is specifically aimed at patients with a gene mutation called BRAF who have previously received treatment with drugs such as nivolumab or pembrolizumab.

    One therapeutic approach involves taking three study drugs: pembrolizumab administered intravenously every 3 weeks, along with encorafenib and binimetinib taken orally daily at home. The second approach involves taking two study drugs: ipilimumab and nivolumab administered intravenously every 3 weeks for the first 4 doses, followed by nivolumab alone every 4 weeks. Both treatments will last for approximately 2 years, but there is no time limit for treatment with encorafenib and binimetinib.

    The research team will closely monitor the patients’ health during regular clinic visits to see how they are responding to treatment. The main goal is to determine which treatment method is more effective in shrinking or eliminating melanoma tumors.

    • Nivolumab
    • Ipilimumab
    • Binimetinib
    • Encorafenib
    • Pembrolizumab
  • A study comparing the combination of lifileucel plus pembrolizumab with pembrolizumab alone in the treatment of unresectable, advanced melanoma

    The aim of this study is to test a new treatment for people with advanced melanoma, a serious form of skin cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. The new treatment combines two different therapies: lifileucel, made from the patient’s own immune cells called tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, and pembrolizumab, a type of immunotherapy drug that helps the body’s immune system fight cancer.

    The study will compare the effectiveness and safety of this combination treatment with pembrolizumab alone. Patients who initially received only pembrolizumab and whose cancer worsened will have the option to switch treatment and receive lifileucel monotherapy.

    The main goals of the study are to see whether the combination treatment can improve the objective response rate, which measures how many patients have had their tumors shrink, and progression-free survival, which is how long patients live without their cancer getting worse. To evaluate the results of the study, patients will be followed for up to 5 years.

    To be eligible for this trial, patients must have advanced melanoma that cannot be surgically removed or has spread to other organs. Additionally, patients cannot be previously treated for metastatic disease, although some prior therapies for earlier stages of melanoma are permitted.

    • Lifileucel
    • Pembrolizumab
  • Study on Secukinumab for Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy

    This clinical trial evaluates the efficacy of the drug secukinumab in treating moderate to severe rotator cuff tendinopathy. Participants will receive secukinumab or a placebo, both in conjunction with standard care, to see if there is an improvement in symptoms and physical function. The research is conducted through a controlled setup where neither the participants nor the researchers know who receives the drug or the placebo to ensure unbiased results. This research aims to provide valuable insights into the potential benefits of secukinumab for those struggling with this shoulder condition.

    • placebo
    • Secukinumab
  • Study of Fidrisertib/IPN60130 in the treatment of Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva (FOP)

    The aim of this study is to test a new drug called fidrisertib (also known as IPN60130) to treat a rare disease called Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva, or FOP. FOP is a grave disease that causes bones to start growing in places they shouldn’t, such as muscles and soft tissues. This causes a lot of pain, swelling, and stiffness in the joints, making movement difficult.

    In the study, some participants will be given the new drug fidrisertib at two different doses, and others will be given a dummy treatment called a placebo. Researchers will monitor the situation closely, performing special tests called low-dose whole-body computed tomography (WBCT) to measure new bone growth. For some older participants, they may also use another type of test called fluorine-18-labeled sodium fluoride positron emission tomography – computed tomography to check bone growth.

    • IPN60130
    • placebo
  • A study comparing biosimilar nivolumab and nivolumab in the treatment of resected melanoma

    The aim of this study is to test whether a new drug called ABP 206 (biosimilar nivolumab) works as well as the approved cancer drug OPDIVO® (nivolumab) in people with advanced cutaneous melanoma that has been surgically removed. The study divided people into 3 groups: one group will receive ABP 206, the second will receive real OPDIVO® approved in the US, and the third will receive the version of OPDIVO® approved in Europe. All of these medicines will be given through an intravenous drip every 4 weeks for up to 1 year, or until the cancer comes back or gets significantly worse.

    The main goal is to check whether ABP 206 (biosimilar nivolumab) is absorbed and maintained in the body in the same way as OPDIVO®. Researchers will also closely monitor how well it works, what the side effects are, and whether the body produces antibodies against it. The entire study will last approximately 13 months for each person joining.

    • Nivolumab biosimilar
    • Nivolumab
  • Study of DYP688 in patients with metastatic uveal melanoma

    The aim of this study is to test a new drug combination to treat metastatic uveal melanoma, a type of cancer that starts in the eye and spreads to other parts of the body. The main drugs being tested are IDE196 (also called darovasertib) and crizotinib, both taken by mouth twice daily.

    Currently, this process is divided into several stages. In the first part, investigators will test two different doses of IDE196 in combination with crizotinib and compare them to other approved therapies such as pembrolizumab, ipilimumab + nivolumab, or dacarbazine. Once they determine the best dose of IDE196, they will move to the next step in which everyone will receive that dose along with crizotinib or one of the other treatments.

    Researchers will primarily look at how long the cancer stays under control without getting worse and how long patients live. It could take about 4 years to get all the answers you need.

    • Darovasertib/IDE196
    • Dacarbazine
    • Nivolumab
    • Crizotinib
    • Ipilimumab
    • Pembrolizumab
  • Study assessing the effectiveness of Tebentafusp administered alone and in combination with Pembrolizumab in the treatment of advanced melanoma

    The aim of this study is to test new treatments for people with advanced skin melanoma that does not respond well to other therapies. The main focus was on a new experimental drug called tebentafusp, which is a special type of protein that helps the body’s immune system recognize and attack cancer cells.

    The study divided patients into three different groups. One group will receive tebentafusp alone. Another group will receive tebentafusp in combination with another immunotherapy drug called pembrolizumab. The third group will receive the treatment that the doctor thinks is best for the patient – this could be another experimental drug, standard therapy, or simply supportive care.

    Scientists are primarily focusing on the effectiveness of these treatments in shrinking tumors and extending patient survival. They will also monitor closely for any side effects to make sure the treatment is safe. The study is expected to last about two years and will include frequent check-ins to monitor patient responses.

    • Tebentafusp
    • Pembrolizumab

See more clinical trials in other cities in Spain:

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