Clinical trials located in

Nice

Nice city is located in France. Currently, 20 clinical trials are being conducted in this city.

Nice, nestled on the French Riviera, is renowned for its stunning coastline along the Baie des Anges. Founded by the Greeks circa 350 BC, it boasts a rich history evident in its varied architecture and the ancient ruins of Cemenelum. The city’s vibrant culture is celebrated in its numerous museums, including the Matisse Museum, and the lively Promenade des Anglais. Nice’s unique blend of French and Italian influences is also reflected in its culinary delights, making it a melting pot of Mediterranean flavors.

  • CT-EU-00120826

    Study on the use of Volixibat for the treatment of pruritus in patients with primary cholangitis (PBC)

    The purpose of this clinical trial is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an investigational drug called volixibat in patients with pruritus caused by primary cholangitis. The study aims to understand how volixibat affects the treatment of pruritus associated with this disease and to evaluate its possible effect on disease progression.

    Study participants will be randomly assigned to a group receiving volixibat or placebo. Volixibat will be administered as oral capsules twice daily. The main goal of the study is to measure the average change in daily pruritus scores using a special Adult Itch Reported Outcome (Adult ItchRO) questionnaire. Adult ItchRO is an 11-point scale for assessing pruritus severity, where 0 means no pruritus and 10 means the worst possible pruritus. The study will run from baseline to week 28.

    • Volixibat
    • Placebo
  • Study on the effectiveness and safety of Ianalumab for treating Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    This clinical trial is designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a drug called ianalumab in patients with warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (wAIHA) who have not responded to at least one previous treatment. The study aims to determine if ianalumab can induce and maintain a durable hemoglobin response compared to a placebo.

    Participants will be randomly assigned to receive one of two different doses of ianalumab or a placebo. If a participant assigned to the placebo group does not respond to the treatment, they may be given ianalumab in an open-label manner, meaning both the participant and the doctor will know they are receiving the drug.

    The investigational treatment will be administered through an intravenous (i.v.) infusion. During the study, participants will have regular visits every other week during the treatment period and primary endpoint follow-up period. For safety monitoring, visits will occur monthly for the first 20 weeks after the last dose and then quarterly for up to two years. If a participant achieves a durable response, additional monthly visits for efficacy will continue for the first two years after the last dose, followed by quarterly visits until the loss of response or the end of the study, which could be up to 39 months after the last participant is randomized.

    The primary goal is to see if ianalumab can achieve a durable hemoglobin response, defined as a hemoglobin level of at least 10 g/dL and an increase of at least 2 g/dL from baseline for a period of at least eight consecutive weeks between weeks 9 and 25, without the need for rescue medication or prohibited treatment.

    This study offers hope for patients with wAIHA who have not found success with other treatments, providing a potential new option to manage their condition.

    • placebo
  • Study of Elafibranor in the treatment of adult patients with Primary Biliary Cholangitis (PBC)

    The clinical trial is aimed at adult patients with confirmed primary cholangitis (PBC). Patients with this condition have an inadequate response or intolerance to ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a drug used to treat PBC.

    Primary cholangitis is a disease that slowly progresses and leads to damage to the bile ducts in the liver. This causes a build-up of bile acids, which further damages the liver. As the disease progresses, scarring of the liver may develop (cirrhosis). PBC is also associated with numerous symptoms, such as itching and fatigue, and may lead to the need for a liver transplant.

    The study evaluates the effectiveness and safety of a drug called elafibranor at a dose of 80 mg daily. The study will compare elafibranor with a placebo, an inactive substance administered for control purposes. The main goal of the study is to test the effectiveness of elafibranor. The safety of long-term use of this medicine and its effect on symptoms such as itching and fatigue will also be checked.

    • Elafibranor
  • Combining Azacitidine and Venetoclax for Higher-Risk Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    The AVENHIR study is an open-label clinical trial for patients with higher-risk chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, a type of blood cancer. This study will evaluate the effectiveness and safety of combining two drugs: Azacitidine and Venetoclax (also known as ABT-199). Azacitidine is a chemotherapy drug, while Venetoclax is a targeted therapy that works by blocking a specific protein in cancer cells.

    The main goals of the study are to determine the overall response rate to this drug combination, which means how many patients achieve complete remission, partial remission, or clinical benefit. The study will also closely monitor safety and any potential dose-limiting side effects during the first two treatment cycles.

    To be eligible for this study, patients must be newly diagnosed with higher-risk chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and have not received any prior treatment with hypomethylating agents like Azacitidine.

    • Venetoclax
  • Study Comparing Asciminib and Nilotinib for Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    This study examines the effects and tolerance of two drugs, asciminib and nilotinib, for treating a specific type of leukemia called Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in its chronic phase. The participants are adults who have been newly diagnosed and have not received previous treatment for this condition. They will be randomly assigned to receive either asciminib or nilotinib. The study aims to see which drug is better tolerated and how effective they are. Throughout the study, participants will be monitored for any side effects and the progress of their treatment until they either experience significant side effects, the disease progresses, or they decide to stop the treatment. Follow-up checks will also be conducted after the treatment ends.

    • Asciminib
    • Nilotinib
  • Study of TL-895 Combined with Ruxolitinib for Myelofibrosis Treatment

    This here clinical trial is studying a new experimental drug called TL-895 for the treatment of myelofibrosis. TL-895 works by blocking certain proteins called tyrosine kinases that are involved in the growth of cancer cells. The study is open to folks who have myelofibrosis, including primary myelofibrosis, post-polycythemia vera myelofibrosis, or post-essential thrombocythemia myelofibrosis.

    Participants in the study will take TL-895 along with another drug called ruxolitinib, which is already approved for treating myelofibrosis. Ruxolitinib, also known as Jakafi or Jakavi, works by blocking different proteins called Janus kinases that are also involved in cancer growth.

    The main goal of the study is to find the best dose of TL-895 to use with ruxolitinib that is both safe and effective. In the first part, different doses of TL-895 will be tested to determine the highest dose that can be tolerated without causing too many side effects. Then in the second part, the recommended dose will be given to all participants, and the researchers will measure how well the combination of drugs reduces spleen size after 24 weeks of treatment.

    So in a nutshell, this study aims to test a new targeted therapy for myelofibrosis by combining it with an existing approved drug, with the hope of improving treatment outcomes for patients with this serious blood disorder.

    • TL-895
    • Ruxolitinib
  • Study of the new oral drug LY3871801 for rheumatoid arthritis

    The aim of this study is to test a new drug called LY3871801 for people suffering from moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis. The main goal is to see if this new drug can help reduce disease activity and improve symptoms better than a placebo. In the first part of the study, doctors will check how much the Disease Activity Score changes after 12 weeks of taking LY3871801 or a placebo. Then, in the second part, they will look at what percentage of patients experience significant improvement, defined as achieving an ACR50 response, which means reducing symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis by 50% or more. Both the real drug and the placebo will be taken by mouth.

    • placebo
    • LY3871801
  • Exploring a new treatment combination for rheumatoid arthritis: baricitinib plus anti-TNF

    This clinical trial is focused on finding a more effective treatment for people with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) who haven’t responded well to previous therapies. The study is comparing two different approaches: one group will receive a combination of baricitinib treatment and an anti-TNF therapy (adalimumab), while the other group will receive baricitinib along with a placebo. The main goal is to see which group shows a greater improvement in their RA symptoms, specifically looking for a 50% improvement in symptoms, known as an ACR 50 response, after 24 weeks from the start of the treatment.

    Baricitinib is a medication that targets certain pathways in the body’s immune system to reduce inflammation and pain in RA. Anti-TNF therapy, like adalimumab, works by blocking the action of a protein in the body that causes inflammation. By combining these two treatments, researchers hope to see a more significant improvement in RA symptoms than with baricitinib alone.

    The trial is important because it aims to provide a new option for patients with RA who have not found relief with current treatments. It’s designed to test the safety and effectiveness of using these two different types of medications together.

    • placebo
    • Adalimumab
    • Baricitinib
  • Comparison of zibotentan/dapagliflozin with dapagliflozin alone in the treatment of chronic kidney disease with high proteinuria

    The study aims to understand how to better treat people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and high proteinuria. This study is in its third phase and involves multiple centers where participants will be closely monitored. The main goal is to compare the effectiveness, safety, and how well participants tolerate a combination treatment of zibotentan/dapagliflozin versus dapagliflozin alone.

    During this study, participants will be randomly assigned to one of two groups. One group will receive the combination of zibotentan and dapagliflozin, while the other group will receive only dapagliflozin. Both treatments aim to slow down the decline in kidney function, which is a major concern for people with CKD and high proteinuria. The key measure of success for this study is the change in eGFR from baseline, which is a test used to check how well the kidneys are working, specifically by measuring the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). This will be assessed at the 24-month mark of the study.

    This research is crucial because it could lead to better treatment options for those suffering from CKD and high proteinuria, potentially improving their quality of life and health outcomes.

    • Zibotentan/Dapagliflozin
    • Dapagliflozin
  • Study on Ravulizumab’s effect on Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy

    The study is looking into the effectiveness of a medication called ravulizumab for adults who have a kidney condition known as Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy (IgAN). This condition can lead to kidney damage over time, and the study aims to find out if ravulizumab can help reduce the amount of protein lost in urine—a common problem in IgAN—and slow down the decrease in kidney function.

    In this study, about 450 participants who are at a high risk of their disease getting worse will be chosen. These participants must have been on stable treatment for their IgAN for at least three months before the study starts. They will then receive either ravulizumab or a placebo, which is a treatment with no active drug, through an IV infusion based on their weight. The main goal is to see if those who receive ravulizumab have a significant improvement in their condition compared to those who receive the placebo.

    The study will have two main checkpoints. The first one, at Week 34, will check how much protein is in the urine, and the second one, at Week 106, will assess how well the kidneys are filtering waste from the blood. Additionally, a smaller group of participants with more advanced kidney issues will receive ravulizumab to further explore its effects.

    After the study ends at Week 106, participants will have the option to continue receiving ravulizumab in a follow-up period to see how long-term treatment affects their condition. This study is a chance for people with IgAN to potentially slow down their disease progression and improve their quality of life.

    • placebo
    • Ravulizumab
  • Oral Azacitidine Maintenance Therapy After CPX-351 for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This clinical trial is studying the use of an oral medication called azacitidine as a maintenance treatment for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who have achieved remission after receiving the chemotherapy drug CPX-351. AML is a type of blood cancer that can develop after receiving chemotherapy or radiation for another disease (called therapy-related AML or t-AML) or can arise from a pre-existing blood disorder (AML with myelodysplasia-related changes or AML-MRC).

    The study aims to see if taking oral azacitidine after achieving remission with CPX-351 can help improve overall survival in patients with these types of AML, as well as in patients with de novo AML (AML that develops without any known cause). Oral azacitidine has been approved by the FDA for use in AML patients who cannot receive intensive curative therapy like a stem cell transplant, but there is limited data on its effectiveness when used specifically after CPX-351 treatment.

    The trial will evaluate how long patients live after starting oral azacitidine maintenance, with survival being measured from the first dose up to 60 months. The safety of long-term oral azacitidine use will also be studied. Patients interested in this trial should speak with their doctor about the potential benefits and risks of participating.

  • CT-EU-00083874

    Study to find the best way to administer pegaspargase in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    This is a study to investigate treatment strategies for children and adolescents diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The study focuses on evaluating the efficacy of a drug called pegaspargase. The drug works by depriving tumor cells of essential nutrients, contributing to its potential efficacy against ALL in pediatric patients. The study aims to determine the optimal way to administer pegaspargase, comparing a single high dose with two lower doses, with additional doses later in treatment. For those at highest risk, a more intensive treatment plan is being investigated. This includes two larger initial doses, followed by additional doses later in treatment. The study is evaluating factors such as potential serious side effects and overall treatment efficacy.

    • pegaspargase
  • Testing a new drug for advanced prostate cancer

    This trial compares a new drug called AZD5305 with a placebo in men who have a specific kind of prostate cancer that has not responded to usual treatment methods. It’s a large trial, with around 1800 participants, and the main aim is to see whether the new treatment can help slow down the disease for longer than current treatments. Participants will be assigned to two different groups, and they will not know whether they’re receiving the real drug or the placebo. Their health will be monitored closely, with regular scans to check the progress of the cancer. The trial will also look at any side effects of the treatment and how it affects the patients’ ability to do their daily activities.

    • Enzalutamide/Xtandi
    • Darolutamide/Nubequa
    • Abiraterone Acetate/Zytiga
    • Saruparib
  • Iptacopan as a new hope for the treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    In this phase 3 trial, iptacopan’s efficacy and safety are assessed in adults with Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria (PNH) who switch from standard anti-C5 treatments to iptacopan. The study, involving multiple centers, consists of an initial 8-week screening and a subsequent 24-week treatment phase with iptacopan. The primary focus is to determine if iptacopan can effectively manage PNH while maintaining patient safety. Participants showing benefits from iptacopan after the treatment period have the opportunity to continue in a roll-over extension study, allowing further observation of iptacopan’s long-term impacts.

    • Iptacopan
  • Study on new combination therapy for aggressive lymphoma

    This study is about a less common but severe form of cancer known as Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL). It is testing if a new medication called epcoritamab, given with a mix of other commonly used cancer medicines, can help control the disease better. These other medicines include rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine, and prednisone, which are often collectively referred to as R-CHOP. The study includes about 900 adults from around the world who have recently been diagnosed with this type of lymphoma. They will be split into two groups. One group will get epcoritamab with R-CHOP and then continue with epcoritamab. The other group will get R-CHOP followed by rituximab. Doctors will carefully watch for changes in the disease and for any side effects. There will be many checks on health, including medical exams, blood tests, questionnaires, and monitoring of any side effects.

    • Prednisone
    • Vincristine
    • Doxorubicin
    • Epcoritamab
    • Cyclophosphamide
    • Rituximab
  • Venetoclax in recurrence of blood cancer after previous stem cell transplantation

    This study aims to investigate the effectiveness and safety of a novel treatment approach, combining the drugs venetoclax and azacitidine, along with donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) in patients experiencing a relapse of one of two of blood-related disorders: myelodysplastic syndrome (condition where blood cells do not develop properly) or acute myeloid leukemia (bone marrow cells become abnormal and begin to accumulate in excess), following stem cell transplantation. The study involves a group of patients for whom standard treatments have not yielded satisfactory results. The objective is to understand whether the combination of new drugs and donor lymphocyte infusion can effectively control these blood disorders, especially after stem cell transplantation. Researchers are monitoring side effects, assessing disease progression, and determining the safety of the procedure. The results may provide valuable insights into effective therapeutic strategies for these challenging blood-related disorders.
    • azacitidine
    • venetoclax
  • Study on luspatercept treatment for Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This study is looking into a medication named Luspatercept and how safe and effective it is for people who have a blood condition known as lower-risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or LR-MDS for short. These individuals often need transfusions or have their blood refreshed with new, healthy red blood cells. The drug will be given at its highest approved dose to see what effect it has. This is being done in a controlled and careful way to make sure everything is safe for the participants in the study. People who are taking part in this study have been identified as having a very low to medium risk according to the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS-R). This means their disease isnt considered high-risk, which makes them suitable candidates for this research. The study is open-label, meaning everybody knows what is in the drug they are getting.

    • Luspatercept
  • Evaluating efinopegdutide treatment for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    This clinical trial explores a new treatment for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a liver condition. It tests the safety and effectiveness of efinopegdutide, a medication administered through weekly injections. Participants, diagnosed with NASH but not severe liver damage, will receive either the medication or a placebo. The study aims to improve liver health and assess potential side effects. It prioritizes participant safety and involves regular health monitoring.

    • Efinopegdutide
    • Semaglutide
  • Evaluating the efficacy of macitentan in the treatment of high pulmonary artery blood pressure

    This study is checking if a 75 mg dose of a medicine called Macitentan can do a better job for patients with a lung condition called Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) compared to a 10 mg dose. The main goal is to see if the 75 mg dose can better delay the patient’s first major health event related to PAH. Major events include things like unplanned hospital stays related to PAH, or their PAH getting worse. The researchers will check if patients’ PAH gets worse by looking at things like their physical exercise ability and signs of heart failure. The study also looks at how patients’ symptoms change from day to day.

    • macitentan
  • Testing gefurilimab treatment in patients with myasthenia gravis

    This study is looking at a potential treatment for a disease called generalized myasthenia gravis (gMG) in adults. It’s called gefurulimab (ALXN1720). For our study, researchers will divide participants into two groups, each of which will be treated differently. One group will receive the new drug. Importantly, the researchers conducting the study will not know who received which treatment. This ensures the fairness and accuracy of the results. Participants’ health will be closely monitored to ensure that ALXN1720 is safe. The main goal is to check whether new mediations are effective. It will be measured by checking whether patients’ condition has improved compared to when the study started. This will take approximately 26 weeks.

    • gefurulimab/ALXN1720

See more clinical trials in other cities in France:

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