Clinical trials located in

Heidelberg

Heidelberg city is located in Germany. Currently, 20 clinical trials are being conducted in this city.

Heidelberg, nestled along the Neckar River in Germany, is renowned for its picturesque landscapes and rich history. The city is home to the Heidelberg University, established in 1386, making it Germany’s oldest university. Dominating its skyline, the Heidelberg Castle, a blend of Gothic and Renaissance styles, offers insights into the region’s past. The city also boasts the Philosophenweg (Philosopher’s Walk), providing stunning views and a testament to its intellectual heritage. Heidelberg played a pivotal role in the Romantic Movement, inspiring poets and artists alike.

  • CT-EU-00121056

    Testing BI 764198 for Kidney Disease (FSGS): A 4-Month Study

    This study is focused on individuals with a kind of kidney disease called Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). The purpose is to see if a drug named BI 764198 can improve kidney health for people with FSGS. There will be three different doses of BI 764198 tested in the study.

    Participants in the study will be divided into four groups randomly. Three groups will receive different doses of BI 764198, and one group will receive a placebo. The study will last about four months. For approximately three months, participants will take a BI 764198 capsule or placebo capsule daily.

    Participants will visit the study site around ten times. It is possible to participate from home, in which case a research nurse will visit for the study visits. Kidney health will be checked by analyzing urine samples that participants collect at home. The results will be compared between the different groups at the end of the study. Throughout the study, doctors will also regularly monitor the general health of participants.

    • BI 764198
    • placebo
  • To evaluate a combination of 3 different drugs versus 2 other drugs in the treatment of patients with melanoma

    This study compares two different approaches to treating advanced melanoma, a type of skin cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. This study is specifically aimed at patients with a gene mutation called BRAF who have previously received treatment with drugs such as nivolumab or pembrolizumab.

    One therapeutic approach involves taking three study drugs: pembrolizumab administered intravenously every 3 weeks, along with encorafenib and binimetinib taken orally daily at home. The second approach involves taking two study drugs: ipilimumab and nivolumab administered intravenously every 3 weeks for the first 4 doses, followed by nivolumab alone every 4 weeks. Both treatments will last for approximately 2 years, but there is no time limit for treatment with encorafenib and binimetinib.

    The research team will closely monitor the patients’ health during regular clinic visits to see how they are responding to treatment. The main goal is to determine which treatment method is more effective in shrinking or eliminating melanoma tumors.

    • Nivolumab
    • Ipilimumab
    • Binimetinib
    • Encorafenib
    • Pembrolizumab
  • Study of a new drug – DYP688 for patients with uveal melanoma and other melanomas with the GNAQ/11 mutation

    This study is testing a new drug called DYP688 for people with metastatic uveal melanoma. It is a type of eye cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Other types of cutaneous melanoma that have certain gene mutations called GNAQ/11 are also being studied.

    The process consists of two main parts. The first part, called the dose escalation phase, aims to find the highest safe dose of DYP688 that can be given without too many side effects. This section includes patients with metastatic uveal melanoma and other melanomas with a GNAQ/11 mutation.

    Once the right dose is determined in the second part, called Phase II, DYP688 will be tested in three groups of patients: people with metastatic uveal melanoma who have previously received another medicine called tebentafusp, people with metastatic uveal melanoma who has not received tebentafusp before, and the third group with melanomas with the GNAQ/11 mutation.

    The main goal is to see how well DYP688 works at reducing or stopping the development of these cancers and to see if there are any serious side effects.

    • DYP688
  • Study of DYP688 in patients with metastatic uveal melanoma

    The aim of this study is to test a new drug combination to treat metastatic uveal melanoma, a type of cancer that starts in the eye and spreads to other parts of the body. The main drugs being tested are IDE196 (also called darovasertib) and crizotinib, both taken by mouth twice daily.

    Currently, this process is divided into several stages. In the first part, investigators will test two different doses of IDE196 in combination with crizotinib and compare them to other approved therapies such as pembrolizumab, ipilimumab + nivolumab, or dacarbazine. Once they determine the best dose of IDE196, they will move to the next step in which everyone will receive that dose along with crizotinib or one of the other treatments.

    Researchers will primarily look at how long the cancer stays under control without getting worse and how long patients live. It could take about 4 years to get all the answers you need.

    • Darovasertib/IDE196
    • Dacarbazine
    • Nivolumab
    • Crizotinib
    • Ipilimumab
    • Pembrolizumab
  • Study assessing the effectiveness of Tebentafusp administered alone and in combination with Pembrolizumab in the treatment of advanced melanoma

    The aim of this study is to test new treatments for people with advanced skin melanoma that does not respond well to other therapies. The main focus was on a new experimental drug called tebentafusp, which is a special type of protein that helps the body’s immune system recognize and attack cancer cells.

    The study divided patients into three different groups. One group will receive tebentafusp alone. Another group will receive tebentafusp in combination with another immunotherapy drug called pembrolizumab. The third group will receive the treatment that the doctor thinks is best for the patient – this could be another experimental drug, standard therapy, or simply supportive care.

    Scientists are primarily focusing on the effectiveness of these treatments in shrinking tumors and extending patient survival. They will also monitor closely for any side effects to make sure the treatment is safe. The study is expected to last about two years and will include frequent check-ins to monitor patient responses.

    • Tebentafusp
    • Pembrolizumab
  • To evaluate the effectiveness of nivolumab used alone and in combination with HBI-8000 in the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma

    This is a study comparing two treatment options for patients with melanoma that cannot be surgically removed or has spread to other parts of the body. One treatment option is an investigational drug called Tucidinostat (HBI-8000) taken by mouth twice a week in combination with an approved drug called nivolumab given by intravenous infusion. Another option is a placebo taken orally twice a week, also in combination with nivolumab given by intravenous infusion.

    The primary goal of the study is to determine whether the combination of HBI-8000 and nivolumab is more effective than nivolumab alone in shrinking the tumor or preventing further tumor progression. The study will also assess the safety of the treatment combinations.

    Patients enrolled in the main study will be randomly assigned to receive either the HBI-8000 combination or a placebo combination. Treatment will continue for up to 2 years or until the cancer progresses, side effects worsen or the patient decides to withdraw from the study. The study will last up to 4 years and will include regular monitoring and follow-up visits.

    • Placebo
    • Tudicdinostat/HBI-8000
  • Study Comparing Asciminib and Nilotinib for Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    This study examines the effects and tolerance of two drugs, asciminib and nilotinib, for treating a specific type of leukemia called Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in its chronic phase. The participants are adults who have been newly diagnosed and have not received previous treatment for this condition. They will be randomly assigned to receive either asciminib or nilotinib. The study aims to see which drug is better tolerated and how effective they are. Throughout the study, participants will be monitored for any side effects and the progress of their treatment until they either experience significant side effects, the disease progresses, or they decide to stop the treatment. Follow-up checks will also be conducted after the treatment ends.

    • Asciminib
    • Nilotinib
  • ARTEMIS study: Protecting kidney health in heart surgery patients with Ravulizumab

    The ARTEMIS study aims to find a new way to protect people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) undergoing heart surgery requiring the use of a heart-lung machine, also known as cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The main aim of this study is to see if a single dose of a drug called ravulizumab given intravenously can reduce the risk of serious kidney problems after surgery, compared with a placebo. Kidney issues are grouped under serious adverse events, and investigators will monitor them for up to 90 days after surgery. The study is carefully controlled and participants will not know whether they are receiving ravulizumab or a placebo to ensure the results are unbiased. This is an important test for people with chronic kidney disease undergoing heart surgery because it may lead to better outcomes and a lower risk of kidney damage after surgery.

    • placebo
    • Ravulizumab
  • Testing New Therapies for Glioblastoma Brain Cancer

    Howdy there, partner! This here trial is called the GBM AGILE study, and it’s aiming to find better treatments for a type of brain cancer called glioblastoma. Now, glioblastoma is a real tough customer, but this study is taking a new approach by testing multiple therapies all at once, both for newly diagnosed cases and for those where the cancer has come back.

    The main goal is to find treatments that work better and can be matched to different types of glioblastoma. The study uses a fancy method called Bayesian response adaptive randomization to assign folks to different treatment arms based on how well those treatments are performing. The most important measure they’re looking at is overall survival – how long patients live after starting treatment.

    Some of the therapies being tested include drugs like temozolomide, lomustine, regorafenib, paxalisib, VAL-083, VT1021, and troriluzole. These come in different forms like capsules, tablets, or infusions, and the dosages and schedules vary depending on the drug. The study is set up so that new promising therapies can be added in, and ones that aren’t working so well can be removed as the trial goes on.

    • VAL-083
    • Troriluzole
    • VT1021
    • Paxalisib
    • Lomustine
    • Temozolomide
    • Regorafenib
  • Sparsentan treatment study for children with Kidney Diseases

    This study involves children with kidney diseases that lead to high levels of protein in the urine. These diseases include Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), Minimal Change Disease (MCD), Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy (IgAN), Immunoglobulin A Vasculitis (IgAV), and Alport Syndrome (AS). The study will use a drug called Sparsentan, administered as an oral suspension or tablet.

    The goal is to determine if Sparsentan is safe and effective for these children. Participants will receive Sparsentan for 112 weeks, and their progress will be monitored to see if protein levels in their urine decrease and if their overall health improves. The study is open-label, meaning all participants will know they are receiving the drug.

    • Sparsentan
  • Testing a new drug for advanced prostate cancer

    This trial compares a new drug called AZD5305 with a placebo in men who have a specific kind of prostate cancer that has not responded to usual treatment methods. It’s a large trial, with around 1800 participants, and the main aim is to see whether the new treatment can help slow down the disease for longer than current treatments. Participants will be assigned to two different groups, and they will not know whether they’re receiving the real drug or the placebo. Their health will be monitored closely, with regular scans to check the progress of the cancer. The trial will also look at any side effects of the treatment and how it affects the patients’ ability to do their daily activities.

    • Enzalutamide/Xtandi
    • Darolutamide/Nubequa
    • Abiraterone Acetate/Zytiga
    • Saruparib
  • Extended safety study for participants using spartalizumab alone or combined

    This study relates to a type of medication called spartalizumab. The goal is to find out if this medicine, when given alone or with other treatments, is safe and doesn’t cause any unwanted side effects. The study is open to people who have already been involved in past studies for spartalizumab. The reason for this is to keep giving these people access to the treatment while also continuously assessing its safety.

    • spartalizumab/PDR001
  • Assessing imatinib inhalation therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension

    This clinical study aims to evaluate the safety and efficacy of an inhaled treatment called imatinib (AV-101) for patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH). The trial is divided into two parts: Phase 2b and Phase 3. In Phase 2b, researchers will test three doses of AV-101 to identify the optimal dose for Phase 3. They will check this by measuring the resistance of the lung vessels — less resistance means the medicine is working. In the following Phase 3, the primary outcome will be the change in the 6-minute walk distance after 24 weeks of treatment compared to a placebo. Participants must be between 18 and 75 years old, have a diagnosis of PAH, and meet specific criteria regarding their disease severity and concomitant therapy.

    • Imatinib/AV-101
  • Studying efficacy of volrustomig for metastatic lung cancer

    The study compared two treatments for metastatic non-small cell lung cancer: volrustomig with chemotherapy and pembrolizumab with chemotherapy. Its purpose is to determine which combination is more effective and safer. Patients will be divided into two groups. One group will receive volrustomig and chemotherapy, and the other group will receive pembrolizumab and chemotherapy. The effectiveness of treatment in each group will then be tracked using imaging tests. In addition, a group of researchers will follow each participant until the end of the study to make sure the treatment is safe and tolerable.

    • Volrustomig
    • Pemetrexed
    • Carboplatin
    • Pembrolizumab
    • Paclitaxel
  • Testing a new inhaled drug for pulmonary arterial hypertension

    This study focuses on the efficiency and safety of a new inhaled drug – MK-5475 – for patients suffering from Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH). The study is divided into two parts: phase 2 and phase 3. In phase 2, the researchers will compare three different doses of MK-5475 with a placebo over a base period of 12 weeks. The goal is to find out if any of the doses can decrease the patient’s pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), which is the resistance that the heart must overcome to pump blood through the lungs. In Phase 3 of the study, the best performing dose from Phase 2 will be used to confirm its long-term effectiveness, safety, and tolerability over a 12-week base period with a follow-up period of up to five years. The focus is to see if this dose is better than a placebo in improving the patient’s walking distance over 6 minutes. The study aims at improving the quality of life and physical health of PAH patients with the help of the new drug.

    • MK-5475
  • Testing new immunotherapy combinations for non-small-cell lung cancer

    This study is testing a new treatment for non-small cell lung cancer that has not yet been treated with drugs. In the study, researchers will look at the effects of combining different immunotherapy drugs and their safety and effectiveness in treating cancer. Participants will receive various combinations of the drugs pembrolizumab, dostarlimab, belrestotug and GSK6097608. The study will last several years and will monitor the effects of different drug combinations and any potential side effects. The study aims to find new ways to treat lung cancer with fewer negative side effects.

    • Belrestotug
    • Dostarlimab
    • GSK6097608- new potential medication for solid tumors
    • Pembrolizumab
  • Testing sotatercept with regular treatment in severe pulmonary arterial hypertension patients

    This investigation seeks to assess the effect of a new drug named Sotatercept on people who are suffering from a serious lung disease called ‘Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension’ (PAH). The trial is intended for individuals with high-risk PAH who are facing significant danger of death. The main goal is to find out if incorporating Sotatercept into the standard treatment can improve outcomes and potentially enhance the chances of survival. Participants who enroll will receive either Sotatercept in addition to their current medication or a placebo alongside their regular treatment.

    • Sotatercept
  • Understanding biliary tract cancer treatment with rilvegostomig and chemotherapy

    This study focuses on a new treatment for biliary tract cancer using the drug rilvegostomig combined with chemotherapy. It is for patients who have had surgery to remove this cancer. The study will compare the effectiveness of rilvegostomig with a placebo in combination with investigator’s choice of chemotherapy options like capecitabine, gemcitabine/cisplatin, or S-1. The main aim is to see if this new treatment can prevent cancer from coming back. About 750 people will take part in this global study, which is in the final phase of testing.

    • Gimeracil
    • Oteracil
    • Tegafur
    • Gemcitabine
    • Cisplatin
    • Rilvegostomig
    • Capecitabine
  • Study on new immunotherapy combinations for untreated advanced lung cancer

    This is a study of patients whose non-small cell lung cancer is at an advanced stage (cannot be cured by surgery or has spread to other parts of the body) and has not been previously treated. The study will test new combinations of immunotherapy (drugs that support the immune system in the fight against cancer) and compare them with a single immunotherapy drug. Scientists want to find out how well these combinations work and how safe they are. The study will also look at how the body processes these drugs. The drugs used in this study are called Belrestoug, GSK4428859A and EOS884448, but these names all refer to the same drug. Scientists will measure the effectiveness of the drugs by looking at how many patients have their cancer shrink and how long it takes for the cancer to start growing again or before the patient dies. They will also record any side effects that may occur during the study and for 90 days after the last treatment dose.

    • Belrestotug
    • Dostarlimab
    • GSK6097608- new potential medication for solid tumors
    • Pembrolizumab

See more clinical trials in other cities in Germany:

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