Clinical trials located in

Dijon

Dijon city is located in France. Currently, 20 clinical trials are being conducted in this city.

Dijon, the capital of the Burgundy region in France, is renowned for its rich history, vibrant culture, and gastronomic excellence. This city, established in the Roman era, flourished in the Middle Ages as a center of trade and learning. The well-preserved medieval and Renaissance buildings, including the Palace of the Dukes of Burgundy, showcase Dijon’s architectural heritage. Dijon is also famous for its mustard, which has been produced locally since the 13th century, and its contribution to French cuisine is unparalleled. The city’s museums, particularly the Musée des Beaux-Arts, house impressive collections of art and artifacts.

  • CT-EU-00084342

    Efficacy and safety of MK-7684A and drug combinations in the treatment of selected malignancies in patients with advanced tumors

    The clinical trial covers various types of cancer such as cervical cancer, endometrial cancer (lining of the uterus), head and neck cancer, gallbladder cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, esophageal cancer, triple negative breast cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, bladder cancer urinary tract, ovarian cancer and stomach cancer.

    The study is testing various therapies combining pembrolizumab and vibostolimab (designated MK-7684A), pembrolizumab alone and combinations with other anticancer drugs such as lenvatinib, 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin, paclitaxel, gemcitabine, carboplatin, docetaxel, bevacizumab, capecitabine and oxaliplatin.

    The aim of the study is to determine the safety, tolerability and preliminary effectiveness of various drug combinations in the treatment of selected advanced malignancies

    • Pembrolizumab
    • Pembrolizumab and Vibostolimab/ MK-7684A
    • Lenvatinib
    • Bevacizumab
    • Gemcitabine
    • Cisplatin
    • Carboplatin
    • Capecitabine
    • Oxaliplatin
    • 5-Fluorouracil
    • Paclitaxel
    • Docetaxel
  • Study of Aplitabart alone or with other treatments in patients with various cancers

    This clinical trial concerns various cancers including solid tumors, colorectal cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, sarcoma, chondrosarcoma, small lymphocytic lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and acute myeloid leukemia.

    The main focus of this study is the investigation of a drug called aplitabart (IGM-8444). This drug will be tested alone and in combination with other medications, which include FOLFIRI (a combination chemotherapy regimen), bevacizumab (a targeted therapy also known as Avastin), birinapant (an investigational drug), venetoclax (a targeted therapy also known as Venclexta), docetaxel (a chemotherapy drug also known as Taxotere or Docefrez), gemcitabine (a chemotherapy drug also known as Gemzar), and azacitidine (a chemotherapy drug also known as VIDAZA). The purpose of the study is to determine the safety, tolerability, and how the body processes (pharmacokinetics) aplitabart when used alone or combined with these other drugs.

    There are two main parts of the study. Phase 1a consists of two stages: Dose escalation, where participants will receive increasing doses of aplitabart to determine the safest and most effective dose, and Expansion, where more participants will receive the best dose to see how well it works alone or with other drugs. Phase 1b will focus on colorectal cancer participants. It will be an open-label, randomized study where some participants will receive a combination of aplitabart, FOLFIRI, and bevacizumab, while others will receive only FOLFIRI and bevacizumab.

    All medications will be given intravenously (through a vein). Different tumor types will be included, such as various solid tumors, colorectal cancers, certain types of leukemia, and lymphomas.

    • Aplitabart (IGM-8444)
    • azacitidine
    • Bevacizumab (and approved biosimilars)
    • Birinapant
    • FOLFIRI
    • Gemcitabine
    • Venetoclax
    • Docetaxel
  • Combining radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and Spartalizumab for treating Metastatic Anal Cancer

    The study concerns patients with metastatic squamous cell anal cancer. The therapy will include a combination of radiotherapy, chemotherapy (docetaxel, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil) and spartalizumab (anti-PD-1 therapy).

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of the combination of these therapies in patients. Radiotherapy uses radiation to damage the DNA of cancer cells. Chemotherapy involves the use of drugs that kill rapidly dividing cells, including cancer cells. Spartalizumab is an immune medicine that helps the immune system detect and destroy cancer cells. Combining these methods may lead to better treatment outcomes.

    The study is aimed at patients with locally advanced or metastatic squamous cell anal cancer who cannot achieve sufficient improvement with standard types of treatment. Patients will undergo therapy consisting of a combination of the above-mentioned drugs and methods to increase the chance of longer survival without disease progression and achieving complete remissions.

  • Study on the effectiveness and safety of M281 in adults with warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    The study focuses on Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (wAIHA), a condition where the immune system mistakenly destroys red blood cells. This leads to symptoms like fatigue, weakness, and jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes). The trial examines the effects of a therapy named M281 (Nipocalimab). The purpose of the study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of M281. Patients participating in the study will receive either M281 or a placebo. It aims to compare improvements in health and monitor any side effects.

    The study structure is as follows:

    Double-blind period: This lasts for 24 weeks, where participants will be randomly assigned to one of three groups. One group will receive M281 every 4 weeks, alternating with a placebo every 4 weeks. Another group will receive M281 every 2 weeks, and the third group will receive a placebo every 2 weeks.

    Open-label extension period: This phase extends for 144 weeks, where all participants will receive M281, either every 2 weeks or every 4 weeks.

    Participants will be monitored for 8 weeks after the last dose to check for any ongoing effects of the treatment. The study aims to provide comprehensive information about the effectiveness and safety of M281 in treating wAIHA.

    • M281
    • placebo
  • Study ANV419 as monotherapy or in combination with pembrolizumab and ipilimumab in patients with metastatic melanoma

    The aim of this study is to test a new drug called ANV419. It will be given alone or in combination with other approved cancer medicines such as pembrolizumab or ipilimumab. The main goal is to see how well ANV419 works and whether it is safe for people with advanced cutaneous melanoma, which is a type of skin cancer that has spread or cannot be surgically removed.

    The trial is currently open to adult patients who have already been treated with drugs that target PD-1 or PD-L1 proteins, but whose cancer has continued to progress. The study will have different parts. First, doctors will find the right dose of ANV419 to use alone or in combination with other treatments. They will then check how many patients respond to treatment, which means their tumors shrink or stop spreading.

    • ANV419
    • Ipilimumab
    • Pembrolizumab
  • Study of a new drug for moderate to severe Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy

    The clinical trial examines the use of secukinumab, a drug, for treating moderate to severe rotator cuff tendinopathy—a shoulder condition characterized by pain and limited movement. The study explores whether secukinumab can improve symptoms and physical function compared to a placebo. Participants will receive either the drug or placebo in addition to standard care, under a randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled setup, to ensure the results are unbiased.

    • placebo
    • Secukinumab
  • A study comparing biosimilar nivolumab and nivolumab in the treatment of resected melanoma

    The aim of this study is to test whether a new drug called ABP 206 (biosimilar nivolumab) works as well as the approved cancer drug OPDIVO® (nivolumab) in people with advanced cutaneous melanoma that has been surgically removed. The study divided people into 3 groups: one group will receive ABP 206, the second will receive real OPDIVO® approved in the US, and the third will receive the version of OPDIVO® approved in Europe. All of these medicines will be given through an intravenous drip every 4 weeks for up to 1 year, or until the cancer comes back or gets significantly worse.

    The main goal is to check whether ABP 206 (biosimilar nivolumab) is absorbed and maintained in the body in the same way as OPDIVO®. Researchers will also closely monitor how well it works, what the side effects are, and whether the body produces antibodies against it. The entire study will last approximately 13 months for each person joining.

    • Nivolumab biosimilar
    • Nivolumab
  • To evaluate the effectiveness of nivolumab used alone and in combination with HBI-8000 in the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma

    This is a study comparing two treatment options for patients with melanoma that cannot be surgically removed or has spread to other parts of the body. One treatment option is an investigational drug called Tucidinostat (HBI-8000) taken by mouth twice a week in combination with an approved drug called nivolumab given by intravenous infusion. Another option is a placebo taken orally twice a week, also in combination with nivolumab given by intravenous infusion.

    The primary goal of the study is to determine whether the combination of HBI-8000 and nivolumab is more effective than nivolumab alone in shrinking the tumor or preventing further tumor progression. The study will also assess the safety of the treatment combinations.

    Patients enrolled in the main study will be randomly assigned to receive either the HBI-8000 combination or a placebo combination. Treatment will continue for up to 2 years or until the cancer progresses, side effects worsen or the patient decides to withdraw from the study. The study will last up to 4 years and will include regular monitoring and follow-up visits.

    • Placebo
    • Tudicdinostat/HBI-8000
  • Study on combining two drugs – Fianlimab and Cemiplimab in patients with previously untreated melanoma

    This study examines two drugs, fianlimab and cemiplimab, given together for the treatment of melanoma. The main goal is to see how effective this drug combination is in treating melanoma compared with pembrolizumab, which is already approved for the treatment of melanoma in adults. The study will also look at whether there are any differences in the effects of these experimental drugs in adolescents and adults.

    Scientists also want to learn about other key issues: what side effects may occur from taking these experimental drugs, how much of the drugs enter the bloodstream over time, and whether the body produces antibodies to the drugs that could make them less effective or cause side effects. They will also check whether taking medications improves patients’ quality of life. Fianlimab and cemiplimab will be administered by intravenous infusion, and pembrolizumab will be administered by intravenous infusion.

    • placebo
    • Fianlimab
    • Cemiplimab
    • Pembrolizumab
  • Study of the drug combination mRNA-4157/V940 and Pembrolizumab in the treatment of melanoma

    The aim of this clinical trial is to test whether a new drug called mRNA-4157/V940 in combination with pembrolizumab can help prevent the recurrence of melanoma in people who have already had it. Currently, mRNA-4157/V940 is what is called “individualized neoantigen therapy,” which means it is a therapy created specifically for each patient based on their cancer cells. Doctors give this drug along with pembrolizumab, a drug that helps the immune system fight cancer cells.

    The main goal of this study is to determine whether taking V940 and pembrolizumab together is more effective in preventing melanoma recurrence than taking pembrolizumab alone. Researchers will closely monitor how long it takes for the cancer to return or spread. The study will last for approximately 74 months.

    • mRNA-4157/V940
    • placebo
    • Pembrolizumab
  • CT-EU-00083874

    Study to find the best way to administer pegaspargase in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    This is a study to investigate treatment strategies for children and adolescents diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The study focuses on evaluating the efficacy of a drug called pegaspargase. The drug works by depriving tumor cells of essential nutrients, contributing to its potential efficacy against ALL in pediatric patients. The study aims to determine the optimal way to administer pegaspargase, comparing a single high dose with two lower doses, with additional doses later in treatment. For those at highest risk, a more intensive treatment plan is being investigated. This includes two larger initial doses, followed by additional doses later in treatment. The study is evaluating factors such as potential serious side effects and overall treatment efficacy.

    • pegaspargase
  • Testing the effectiveness of new drugs in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration

    The study is investigating a potential breakthrough in treating age-related vision loss, specifically neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). It introduces a novel therapy, OPT-302, and pairs it with Aflibercept, comparing this combination’s effectiveness against the standard treatment. Participants undergo a series of thorough eye examinations and treatments to monitor the progression of their vision health. The research aims to offer a clearer understanding of how these treatments can better manage and possibly improve vision for individuals dealing with nAMD, contributing valuable knowledge to the field of eye health care.

    • aflibercept
    • OPT-302
  • Study on new combination therapy for aggressive lymphoma

    This study is about a less common but severe form of cancer known as Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL). It is testing if a new medication called epcoritamab, given with a mix of other commonly used cancer medicines, can help control the disease better. These other medicines include rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine, and prednisone, which are often collectively referred to as R-CHOP. The study includes about 900 adults from around the world who have recently been diagnosed with this type of lymphoma. They will be split into two groups. One group will get epcoritamab with R-CHOP and then continue with epcoritamab. The other group will get R-CHOP followed by rituximab. Doctors will carefully watch for changes in the disease and for any side effects. There will be many checks on health, including medical exams, blood tests, questionnaires, and monitoring of any side effects.

    • Prednisone
    • Vincristine
    • Doxorubicin
    • Epcoritamab
    • Cyclophosphamide
    • Rituximab
  • Testing a new combination therapy with acalabrutinib for a specific type of lymphoma

    This clinical trial is investigating a new combination therapy for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, a type of lymphoma. The treatment combines Acalabrutinib, a targeted therapy drug, with R-CHOP, a chemotherapy mix consisting of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone, a standard chemotherapy regimen. The aim of the study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of this combination in improving patient outcomes. It focuses on patients who have not been previously treated for lymphoma. The study aims to find better treatment strategies for this particular type of lymphoma.

    • Prednisone
    • Vincristine
    • Doxorubicin
    • Acalabrutinib
    • Cyclophosphamide
    • Rituximab
  • Studying new potential drug with atezolizumab for non-small cell lung cancer

    This study is looking at a new cancer drug called GB1211, used along with another drug called Atezolizumab, to treat a type of lung cancer called Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC). The study aims to see how safe GB1211 is and how well it works. It is separated into three parts, where the first part helps in figuring out the right dose. In this part, two groups of 4 patients each will receive either 200 mg or 400 mg doses of GB1211 along with Atezolizumab, after which their health changes will be monitored. Patients can continue treatment for 12 weeks if it helps. In the next part, more patients will join, some getting GB1211 and some a placebo, to see how well it works. Depending on how they respond over 12 weeks, they might get offered the chance to carry on with the treatment in the third part of the study. After the study is over, researchers will check all patients for any side effects happened after 4 weeks.

    • Selvigaltin
    • Atezolizumab
  • Comparing a new treatment with standard care for advanced colorectal cancer

    This research study is for people suffering from a type of bowel cancer that has spread to other parts of the body, known as ‘metastatic colorectal cancer’. The purpose of the study is to compare a new combination of medications against the regular treatments that are already in use. Patients participating in the study will be placed into two groups: one group will receive the standard treatment, and the other group will try a new combination of drugs (tucatinib, trastuzumab, and 5-Fluorouracil, leucovorin,,oxaliplatin). This study will also help to understand the side effects, which are any unexpected symptoms or changes that can occur when taking these medications. Ultimately, the goal of this study is to help learn more about which treatment is more effective in delaying the progression of the disease and improving the patients’ quality of life.

    • levoleucovorin
    • leucovorin
    • Fluorouracil
    • Bevacizumab
    • Cetuximab
    • Tucatinib
    • Oxaliplatin
    • Trastuzumab
  • Examining repotrectinib vs crizotinib in advanced lung cancer treatment

    This trial is named TRIDENT-3, it’s for people who have a particular type of lung cancer that has spread beyond the lungs (advanced or metastatic). The lung cancer for this study is called ‘Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer’ (NSCLC) and it’s positive for an important part of the cells called ‘ROS1.’ The trial will compare two medicines: repotrectinib and crizotinib. People participating in the trial have not been treated with a group of drugs called ‘Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors’ (TKIs) before. The main goal of this study is to see how effective and safe these two drugs are for these patients.

    • Repotrectinib
    • Crizotinib
  • Research on medicine combination for B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This study is about testing epcoritamab, a new drug for a type of blood cancer called B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma. The goal is to see if the drug is safe for people and can successfully fight the cancer. Doctors will combine this drug with other medicines that are typically used to treat this cancer. The combined treatment will vary for different groups of patients, depending on factors like their specific type of cancer or their overall health. Some patients will be given epcoritamab on its own, while others will receive it with other cancer medicines. The study has two parts. The first part is to find a safe dose of the drug. The second part is to determine how well this drug helps in treating the cancer. Side effects will be closely monitored during the study.

    • etoposide phosphate
    • oxaliplatin
    • Prednisone
    • Dexamethasone
    • Carboplatin
    • Epcoritamab
    • Ifosfamide
    • Cytarabine
    • Gemcitabine
    • Cyclophosphamide
    • Vincristine
    • Doxorubicin
    • Bendamustine
    • Lenalidomide
    • Rituximab
  • Study on the safety of T-DXd and immunotherapy in Advanced or Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    The DESTINY-Lung03 trial aims to understand how safe and effective a medicine called trastuzumab deruxtecan (T-DXd) is for individuals with a form of lung cancer known as HER2 over-expressing non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). T-DXd will be combined with other cancer-fighting medicines identified as Immunotherapy Agents. Some patients will receive additional chemotherapy, others will not. The plan is to test different dosing levels of T-DXd and Immunotherapy Agents in different parts of the study to understand what dose is most effective and safe. We’ll also test T-DXd along with a medicine called MEDI5752 to see how this combination affects the same forms of lung cancer.

    • MEDI4736 (Durvalumab)
    • T-DXd (Trastuzumab deruxtecan)
    • MEDI5752
    • Pemetrexed
    • Cisplatin
    • Carboplatin
  • Study of new drug ARV-471 (PF-07850327) and fulvestrant in patients with advanced breast cancer

    The study looks at advanced breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (metastasizes). It is aimed at patients with ER+/HER2- breast cancer, which means that the cancer responds to estrogen (a hormone) and does not have excessive amounts of the HER2 protein. The study will compare two drugs: ARV-471 (PF-07850327, vepdegestrant) and fulvestrant.

    Fulvestrant is a drug already used to treat breast cancer, while ARV-471 is a new drug. The aim of this study is to determine whether ARV-471 is safe and effective compared to fulvestrant in patients with advanced breast cancer that cannot be cured by surgery or radiotherapy.

    The study is open to adults with breast cancer recurrence or metastases that cannot be fully cured by surgery or radiotherapy. Candidates should have a confirmed diagnosis of ER+/HER2- breast cancer and previous treatment with CDK4/6 inhibitors combined with hormonal therapy. Patients must not have active brain metastases or liver, kidney or bone marrow failure.

    Treatment continues until the cancer gets worse or the side effects become too severe. Clinic meetings take place approximately every 4 weeks.

    • Vepdegrestrant/ARV-471
    • Fulvestrant

See more clinical trials in other cities in France:

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