Clinical trials located in

Udine

Udine city is located in Italy. Currently, 20 clinical trials are being conducted in this city.

Udine, nestled in Italy’s northeastern region, stands as a testament to Venetian Gothic architecture. Founded in 983, this city is steeped in history, with its heart at Piazza della Libertà, acclaimed as the most beautiful Venetian square on the mainland. The iconic Udine Castle, perched atop a hill, offers panoramic views and houses important art galleries. Udine is also celebrated for its connection to the painter Tiepolo, who left a significant mark on the city’s artistic heritage. Additionally, it’s a pivotal hub for wine production, surrounded by renowned vineyards contributing to the Friuli Venezia Giulia wine region.

  • CT-EU-00121743

    Study comparing Giredestrant and Fulvestrant with CDK4/6 Inhibitors for advanced breast cancer

    This study focuses on a type of advanced breast cancer known as Estrogen Receptor-Positive (ER+), HER2-Negative breast cancer. This kind of cancer is driven by hormones and does not have high levels of the HER2 protein. The study aims to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a new drug called Giredestrant compared to an existing drug called Fulvestrant. Both drugs will be combined with one of three medicines that inhibit proteins in cancer cells called CDK4/6 inhibitors (Palbociclib, Ribociclib, or Abemaciclib).

    In this study, participants will be randomly assigned to one of two groups. One group will receive Giredestrant and the other will receive Fulvestrant. Both groups will also receive one of the CDK4/6 inhibitors chosen by their doctor. These combinations are being tested to see which works better to stop the cancer from growing or spreading.

    The drugs involved include Giredestrant (RO7197597, RG6171, GDC-9545), Fulvestrant, Abemaciclib, Palbociclib, Ribociclib, and LHRH Agonist (for pre/perimenopausal women and men).

    The goal is to find out if Giredestrant can provide better results and fewer side effects compared to Fulvestrant when both are combined with one of the CDK4/6 inhibitors. The study may involve regular tests and assessments to monitor the cancer’s progress and the patient’s response to the treatment.

    Participants will continue to receive the study drugs as long as they are benefiting from them and not experiencing unacceptable side effects. The study involves close monitoring to ensure the safety and well-being of all participants throughout the treatment period.

    • LHRH Agonist
    • Abemaciclib
    • Giredestrant
    • Palbociclib
    • Ribociclib
    • Fulvestrant
  • A Study of Obexelimab for treating Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia


    Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (wAIHA) is a condition where the body’s immune system attacks and destroys its own red blood cells. This study will examine whether obexelimab can help treat people with wAIHA. Obexelimab is a special type of treatment called a monoclonal antibody, which can target and potentially reduce the activity of some immune cells involved in this disease.

    Study participants will go through different stages. The first stage is a Safety and Dose Confirmation Run-In Period (SRP) lasting for six months. During this time, all participants will receive obexelimab through injections under the skin. This is followed by the Randomized Control Period (RCP), which also lasts for six months. In this stage, participants will be randomly divided into two groups: one group will continue to receive obexelimab, while the other group will receive a placebo.

    After these initial periods, participants will have the chance to continue receiving obexelimab in an Open Label Extension (OLE) period lasting up to a year. Throughout the study, participants will visit the study site for regular checks to ensure the treatment’s effectiveness and safety.

    • Obexelimab
  • Study on combining two drugs – Fianlimab and Cemiplimab in patients with previously untreated melanoma

    This study examines two drugs, fianlimab and cemiplimab, given together for the treatment of melanoma. The main goal is to see how effective this drug combination is in treating melanoma compared with pembrolizumab, which is already approved for the treatment of melanoma in adults. The study will also look at whether there are any differences in the effects of these experimental drugs in adolescents and adults.

    Scientists also want to learn about other key issues: what side effects may occur from taking these experimental drugs, how much of the drugs enter the bloodstream over time, and whether the body produces antibodies to the drugs that could make them less effective or cause side effects. They will also check whether taking medications improves patients’ quality of life. Fianlimab and cemiplimab will be administered by intravenous infusion, and pembrolizumab will be administered by intravenous infusion.

    • placebo
    • Fianlimab
    • Cemiplimab
    • Pembrolizumab
  • Investigating new treatment method for specific head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    This clinical trial is focused on evaluating the safety and efficacy of a new treatment for patients with a specific type of head and neck cancer caused by Human Papilloma Virus 16 (HPV16) and characterized by the presence of the PD-L1 protein. The treatment involves a combination of a novel drug, BNT113, and a known drug, pembrolizumab. The primary objective is to determine whether this combination is more effective than pembrolizumab alone in assisting the body’s immune system in fighting the cancer. The trial is divided into two parts. In the initial phase, the focus is on assessing the safety of the new drug combination. Subsequently, in the second phase, patients will be randomly assigned to receive either the new combination or pembrolizumab alone. The trial aims to compare the outcomes of the two groups, evaluating tumor response (whether tumors shrink, remain the same, or grow) and monitoring any potential side effects resulting from the treatment.

    • BNT113
    • Pembrolizumab
  • Examining long-term use of osimertinib in treating lung cancer

    This study is investigating a drug known as osimertinib. This includes people who have had successful surgery to remove a type of lung cancer called NSCLC. This cancer is caused by a mutation in a protein called EGFR. The aim of this study is to see if osimertinib can prevent the cancer from coming back within 5 years. The goal is also to ensure the drug’s safety for patients. Patients will receive the drug regardless of whether they received chemotherapy after surgery or not. Here are some of the issues investigators in this study will look at: how long it takes for the cancer to come back, if at all; how many people are alive without the disease after 3, 4 and 5 years; and how long people live after starting the drug. Additionally, a key part of the study is monitoring for any potential side effects.

    • Osimertinib
  • Testing gefurilimab treatment in patients with myasthenia gravis

    This study is looking at a potential treatment for a disease called generalized myasthenia gravis (gMG) in adults. It’s called gefurulimab (ALXN1720). For our study, researchers will divide participants into two groups, each of which will be treated differently. One group will receive the new drug. Importantly, the researchers conducting the study will not know who received which treatment. This ensures the fairness and accuracy of the results. Participants’ health will be closely monitored to ensure that ALXN1720 is safe. The main goal is to check whether new mediations are effective. It will be measured by checking whether patients’ condition has improved compared to when the study started. This will take approximately 26 weeks.

    • gefurulimab/ALXN1720
  • Testing ravulizumab for transplant-related blood complications

    The study is examining a drug called ravulizumab used in adults and teenagers with a blood vessel disease called thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) after a bone marrow transplant. Sometimes, new cells growing after a bone marrow transplant can cause problems in the blood vessels leading to TMA. So this study will investigate whether ravulizumab can help in this situation. In the first stage, each participant will receive the drug to determine the best dose. In the second phase, some will receive ravulizumab and best supportive care, while others will receive placebo and best supportive care. After 26 weeks of treatment, doctors will continue to monitor and record the patients’ health for another 26 weeks. Special blood tests will be done to check if the medicine is working.

    • Ravulizumab
  • Continued study of ozanimod for severe Crohn’s Disease

    This research is about an extended study on the use of an oral medication named Ozanimod for people suffering from Crohn’s disease. Crohn’s disease can make the stomach and intestines really uncomfortable, causing swellings and pain. The main aim of this study is to check if this medicine, Ozanimod, is safe for intake and how effective it is in easing these uncomfortable feelings in the stomach. The researchers will rate patients’ illnesses using the Crohn’s Disease Activity Index (a measurement tool).

    • Ozanimod
  • Testing navitoclax and ruxolitinib effective on myelofibrosis patients

    This study is trying to find out if the combination of two drugs called Navitoclax and Ruxolitinib can help people with a type of blood cancer called Myelofibrosis. Around 330 adults, who have myelofibrosis that hasn’t responded to previous treatments, will get either the new drug combination or the current best treatment for their disease. Doctors will measure whether the new combination is more effective by checking how much the size of participants’ spleens have changed during the study with scans, measuring fatigue levels and checking how well their bone marrow works.

    • Navitoclax
    • Ruxolitinib
  • Studying ozanimod as ongoing treatment for Severe Crohn’s Disease

    This trial is to test a medication called Ozanimod on people who have a serious type of Crohn’s Disease. Crohn’s Disease can make the stomach hurt a lot and sometimes makes difficulty eating.  The researchers want to see if the medication helps to calm the disease, so patients feel better. Some patients will get the Ozanimod and others will get a placebo.  The researchers use  ‘Crohn’s Disease Activity Index’ to see how the disease is doing.

    • Ozanimod
  • Tividenofusp Alfa vs Idursulfase: compare efficacy and safety in mucopolysaccharidosis type II

    This study aims to investigate a potential treatment for mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II). The experimental drug, tividenofusp alfa (DNL310), will be compared to standard care-idursulfase. The goal is to assess the effectiveness and safety of this drug. Participants may have the option to enter an open-label treatment phase (a type of clinical trial in which both researchers and study participants are aware of the administered treatment), where participants will receive either DNL310 or idursulfase based on specific criteria.

    • tividenofusp alfa/DNL310
    • idursulfase
  • Study of evorpacept in patients with advanced HER2+ gastric cancer

    This study will investigate the drug evorpacept (ALX148). The clinical trial consists of two phases and includes patients with advanced stomach or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer showing excessive HER2 receptor expression. The study focuses on patients whose disease did not respond to prior HER2-directed therapy and chemotherapy containing fluoropyrimidine or platinum. Patients participating in the study will be closely monitored to see how well the cancer responds to the treatment and to track any side effects they might experience. By looking at these results, researchers hope to find out if this new combination can offer a more effective treatment option for patients with this type of advanced gastric cancer, potentially leading to better management of the disease and improved survival rates.

    • Evorpacept/ALX148
    • Ramucirumab
    • Trastuzumab
    • Paclitaxel
  • Testing Milvexian’s effectiveness in preventing repeat strokes

    This research trial, called LIBREXIA-STROKE, will test a medication called Milvexian on those who have recently had a stroke or a high-risk ‘mini-stroke’. In its 3rd testing phase, the study will involve a system where the patients won’t know whether they are receiving the actual drug or a substitute with no effect, referred to as a ‘placebo’, to maintain fairness. Milvexian is a medication that can potentially reduce the risk of having another stroke, and this trial aims to observe how effective it is in doing so. The trial will look at when the first stroke happens after starting the trial, if other major heart or limb diseases occur, or if strokes occur in the first 90 days.

    • Milvexian
  • Comparison of different treatments for follicular lymphoma

    This study involves comparing two treatments for a condition known as follicular or marginal zone lymphoma, both of which are types of cancer affecting lymph cells. The first treatment combines zanubrutinib with an antibody called Anti-CD20, while the second treatment involves lenalidomide and rituximab. These treatments are intended for patients who have not responded or have stopped responding to conventional treatment. One of the primary objectives of the study is to determine which treatment is more effective in preventing the cancer from progressing, referred to as progression-free survival. Additionally, the study aims to assess the impact of these treatments on the patients’ quality of life, evaluating various aspects through questionnaires related to physical and emotional well-being, symptoms, and the ability to perform normal activities.

    • Zanubrutinib
    • Obinutuzumab
    • Lenalidomide
    • Rituximab
  • Study on dazostinag & pembrolizumab for advanced solid tumors

    The purpose of this study is to test a new drug called dazostinag. A study is being conducted to see whether this drug is helpful in adults with advanced forms of solid cancer. Some people are given dazostinag alone, while others are given it with another medicine called pembrolizumab. Scientists’ focus here is on finding out whether these drugs cause any side effects, and finding out what the maximum dose is that people can take without serious side effects. The study consists of two parts, including a dose escalation phase and a dose escalation phase. In the first part, the dose of dazostinag will be gradually increased, given alone or in combination with pembrolizumab. In the second part, Dazostinag will be tested with pembrolizumab and other anticancer drugs. This section will focus on patients with specific cancers that are difficult to remove or have spread to other parts of the body.

    • Dazostinag
    • Platinum
    • Pembrolizumab
    • 5-Fluorouracil
  • Examining new treatment for digestive complications of Graft Versus Host Disease

    This study is examining the effects of a therapy called MaaT013 in patients who do not respond well to a drug called Ruxolitinib. Patients suffer from a disease called acute GVHD that affects their stomach. Previous studies have shown promising results, with most patients showing improvement after receiving MaaT013. Due to these results, MaaT013 will be used as “rescue therapy” in patients who do not improve with steroids or JAK inhibitors, drugs often used to treat the disease. The standard first treatment for acute GVHD is steroids, but some patients do not respond well to this treatment, and those who do may have serious side effects if they take high doses for a long time. Therefore, scientists are interested in exploring alternative treatments such as MaaT013. A drug called Ruxolitinib was approved by the FDA in 2019, but again, not all patients respond well to this treatment, prompting the need to develop alternatives.

    • MaaT013- new potential medication for gastrointestinal acute graft-versus-host disease
  • Testing ranibizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration

    This study, called Velodrome, is looking into a new treatment method for a condition affecting the eyes called ‘Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration’. The treatment uses a technique called the Port Delivery System, along with a drug called ranibizumab. The aim of the study is to see how safe and effective this treatment is over a period of 36 weeks, compared to a period of 24 weeks. This study is important because it might mean people with this condition might have to have fewer treatments, and potentially see better.

    • Ranibizumab
  • Exploring Fipaxalparant as a new treatment method for Diffuse Cutaneous Systemic Sclerosis

    This extensive study, conducted across multiple hospitals, aims to assess the effectiveness and safety of a Fipaxalparant (HZN-825), in individuals with a skin condition known as Diffuse Cutaneous Systemic Sclerosis. The study employs a double-blind design, where some participants receive the actual drug, and others receive a placebo (a drug with no active substance), with neither the doctors nor the patients being aware of which treatment they are receiving. The trial is scheduled to run for approximately one year, with regular check-ups every six weeks. If participants successfully complete the year-long trial, they may be invited to continue using the drug for an additional year in a follow-up study. For safety reasons, a check-up will also be conducted four weeks after participants stop taking the drug.

    • Fipaxalparant/HZN-825
  • Comparing abelacimab and apixaban treatments for blood clots in cancer patients

    This research study is looking at how two different medicines, abelacimab and apixaban, can help people with a severe medical problem called Cancer Associated Thrombosis (CAT). CAT happens when blood clots form inside the veins (a condition called Venous Thromboembolism or VTE) in people with cancer. These blood clots can cause other serious health issues. In this study, the researchers will see if abelacimab (which is given monthly) is as good as apixaban if not better (which you take twice a day every day) for six months. And then look at whether the blood clots come back, if any bleeding happens, and if patients had to stop treatment.

    • Abelacimab
    • Apixaban
  • Comparison of two drugs in the treatment of venous thromboembolism

    The study compares abelacimab and dalteparin in treating blood clot issues in patients with gastrointestinal or genitourinary cancers. It’s open to adults, focusing on those without plans for curative surgery. Abelacimab is given monthly, and dalteparin daily, over six months. It assesses clot recurrence, bleeding risks, and treatment continuation. The goal is to find safer, effective blood clot treatments for cancer patients, improving their care and outcomes.

    • Abelacimab
    • Dalteparin

See more clinical trials in other cities in Italy:

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