Clinical trials on Multiple Myeloma

Understanding Multiple Myeloma

Multiple Myeloma is a type of cancer that originates in the plasma cells, a form of white blood cell which is made in the bone marrow. These cells are crucial for the body’s immune response, producing antibodies that help fight infection. However, in multiple myeloma, cancerous plasma cells accumulate in the bone marrow, outcompeting healthy cells and producing abnormal proteins that can cause a range of health issues.

Signs, Symptoms, and Treatment

The symptoms of multiple myeloma can vary widely, including bone pain, fatigue, frequent infections, and kidney dysfunction. Due to its insidious onset, it may initially be mistaken for other conditions, making early diagnosis challenging. Diagnosis typically involves a combination of blood tests, urine tests, imaging studies, and bone marrow biopsy to assess the extent of disease and the specific characteristics of the myeloma cells.

Treatment for multiple myeloma has evolved significantly over the years, incorporating a variety of approaches to manage the disease. Therapeutic strategies may include chemotherapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy, and stem cell transplantation. The choice of treatment depends on several factors, including the stage of the disease, the patient’s overall health, and the presence of any complications. While there is currently no cure for multiple myeloma, these treatments can significantly improve quality of life and survival rates.

  • CT-EU-00119004

    Testing Vemurafenib and Cobimetinib for BRAF Positive Cancers

    This clinical trial is for patients with cancers that have a specific change in their cancer cells known as BRAF V600 mutation. It uses two drugs, vemurafenib and cobimetinib, to see if they can effectively treat various types of cancers such as solid tumors, haematological malignancies, melanoma, thyroid cancer, ovarian neoplasms, colorectal neoplasms, laryngeal neoplasms, non-small-cell lung carcinoma, glioma, multiple myeloma, and Erdheim-Chester disease. The purpose of this study is to determine if these drugs can help treat cancers with the BRAF V600 mutation.

    In the study, participants will receive both drugs until their disease progresses, they experience unacceptable side effects, or they decide to withdraw. Blood samples will be collected at different times during the treatment for research purposes. Participants will be monitored every three months for two years after completing the treatment.

    • Vemurafenib
    • Cobimetinib
  • Exploring treatment options for newly diagnosed Multiple Myeloma

    This clinical trial investigates two treatment paths for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients who are not planned for stem cell transplant initially. The first group receives a combination of bortezomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone (VRd) followed by cilta-cel, an innovative therapy. The second group receives VRd followed by continued treatment with lenalidomide and dexamethasone (Rd). The study evaluates the effectiveness of these treatments by monitoring disease progression, treatment response, and patient survival rates. It also assesses the safety and side effects of the treatments, aiming to improve the quality of life and outcomes for patients with multiple myeloma. The trial’s objective is to provide valuable data on the potential benefits of integrating cilta-cel in the treatment regimen, compared to the more traditional approach, offering insights for better management of this challenging cancer.

    • Cilta-cel
    • Fludarabine
    • Lenalidomide
    • Dexamethasone
    • Cyclophosphamide
    • Bortezomib
  • Trialing new drug combination in myeloma patients

    This research study is testing two different combinations of drugs for treating a type of cancer called multiple myeloma; one combination is named SPd (selinexor, pomalidomide and dexamethasone) and the other EloPd (elotuzumab, Pomalidomide and Dexamethasone). The goal of the study is to compare how effective these drug combos are, if they are safe, and how they affect life quality. The patients suitable for this study are those who tried other drugs without complete success. The study measures if cancer stopped growing or came back, and also assesses various aspects of patients’ health condition and feelings using questionnaires. The severity of any possible side effects will be evaluated cautiously.

    • Dexamethasone
    • Pomalidomide
    • Elotuzumab
    • Selinexor
  • A study of talquetamab in combination with other anticancer therapies for the treatment of Multiple Myeloma

    The study examines the efficacy and safety of a new drug, talquetamab, in combination with other medications: carfilzomib, daratumumab SC, lenalidomide, and pomalidomide, for the treatment of multiple myeloma, a type of blood cancer. Patients receive talquetamab with various drug combinations, aiming to improve treatment outcomes and understand the best therapeutic approach for this challenging blood cancer. The trial’s focus is on enhancing life quality for patients by exploring innovative combination therapies.

    • Daratumumab SC
    • Carfilzomib
    • Pomalidomide
    • Talquetamab
    • Lenalidomide
  • Research study on a new technique to treat multiple myeloma

    The research study known as TAURUS aims to assess the effectiveness of a novel technique in detecting minute quantities of a cancer known as multiple myeloma. The examination method under consideration is referred to as Mass Spectrometry Minimal Residual Disease (MS-MRD). The test is being applied to individuals recently diagnosed with multiple myeloma who have not initiated any treatment. The distinctive aspect of this test lies in its utilization of a blood sample, eliminating the need for a bone marrow sample. The objective is to determine whether the blood test can yield comparable results to the bone marrow test. Successful outcomes may suggest the potential avoidance of the more uncomfortable bone marrow test in the future. Additionally, the study aims to assess the percentage of individuals reaching a stage where no cancer cells are detectable in their body using both test methodologies.

    • Lenalidomide
    • Dexamethasone
    • Bortezomib
    • Daratumumab
  • Study on isatuximab with other drugs for high-risk multiple myeloma

    This is a study to test a new treatment for patients with a high-risk form of multiple myeloma, a type of cancer in the blood cells. The treatment uses a drug called isatuximab in combination with two existing drugs, lenalidomide and dexamethasone. The main goal of the study is two-fold. The first part aims to confirm the right dosage of isatuximab when combined with lenalidomide and dexamethasone. The second part aims to prove that this combination can extend the time before the disease gets worse, as compared to just using lenalidomide and Dexamethasone. Secondary goals of the study include assessing how well the treatment responds, how long the response lasts, and how it affects the disease stage. The study also aims to evaluate the time until the need for first-line treatment, potential side effects, and the impact of different genetic subtypes on patient outcomes. This study is expected to last 12 years, which includes a screening period, a treatment period, and a follow-up period.

    • Isatuximab
    • Lenalidomide
    • Dexamethasone
  • Study of the effectiveness of linvoseltamab in the treatment of multiple myeloma

    This is a study for adult patients with multiple myeloma, a type of cancer, that has come back or not responded to other treatments. The objective is to check the safety of a new medicine called Linvoseltamab (REGN5458) and find out the best dose for patients. The researchers are also interested in how it fights cancer and how long it remains in the blood. The route of administration that will be used in the study is intravenous or subcutaneous. Some patients will initially receive the drug intravenously, and later subcutaneously.

    • Linvoseltamab/REGN5458
  • Comparing treatments in multiple myeloma: talquetamab in combination with other medication

    This study aims to explore the combined effects of talquetamab, daratumumab, pomalidomide, and dexamethasone for treating relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma. One group of patients will receive talquetamab subcutaneous in combination with daratumumab and pomalidomide. The second group will receive talquetamab subcutaneous in combination with daratumumab. The patients of the third group will be treated with daratumumab subcutaneous in combination with pomalidomide and dexamethasone. The research is divided into three phases: screening, treatment, and post-treatment follow-up. The study will assess efficacy, safety, and monitoring various health indicators at specific time points. The results of this combination therapy will be compared to choose the safest and the most effective treatment. The overall duration of the study is expected to be up to 6 years and 6 months.

    • Pomalidomide
    • Talquetamab
    • Dexamethasone
    • Daratumumab
  • Study of SAR445514 for patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma and light-chain amyloidosis.

    This comprehensive study delves into SAR445514’s potential to treat two serious disorders: relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM) and relapsed/refractory light-chain amyloidosis (RRLCA). The trial is structured into three detailed phases. Initially, the dose-escalation phase aims to identify the safest dose level. Following this, the dose-optimization phase seeks to determine the most effective dose. Finally, the expansion phase rigorously evaluates the therapeutic impact of SAR445514 at the optimized dose. Throughout these phases, the study meticulously monitors participant responses, side effects, and overall health changes. The ultimate goal is to establish a new, effective treatment option, enhancing the quality of life and survival prospects for individuals battling these complex and challenging conditions.

    • SAR445514- new potential medication for advanced blood cancers
  • Evaluating different drugs for advanced multiple myeloma

    This study is conducted to see how good a medication called Elranatamab is for individuals having multiple myeloma, a blood cancer that affects the marrow inside your bones. This study will use Elranatamab alone, or pair it with another medication called Daratumumab. The aim is to see if Elranatamab alone or mixed with Daratumumab is better than the current treatment of Daratumumab mixed with two other medications named Pomalidomide and Dexamethasone. This research is primarily for individuals who have undergone previous treatments with medications, Lenalidomide and a proteasome inhibitor. The study has two parts. The aim of the first part is the safety test and effects of Elranatamab mixed with Daratumumab at various doses. The second part will divide participants into three groups: Elranatamab alone, Elranatamab with Daratumumab, or the current treatment. The goal is to observe which treatment is safer and works better.

    • Elranatamab
    • Pomalidomide
    • Dexamethasone
    • Daratumumab
  • Long-term safety study of participants previously treated with Cilta-cel

    The clinical trial is a comprehensive, long-term study aimed at monitoring the safety of ciltacabtagene autoleucel (cilta-cel), a specialized CAR-T cell therapy, in adults. This therapy, used in previous studies, is known for its innovative approach to treating certain blood cancers. Participants who received cilta-cel in earlier phases of research are enrolled for extended observation. Even though the participants will not receive new treatments as part of this study, their health will be regularly monitored. The study extends over a prolonged period, up to 15 years, to ensure a thorough understanding of the long-term impacts of the treatment. This extended follow-up is crucial to detect any late-occurring side effects that might not be apparent during shorter study periods.

    • Ciltacabtagene autoleucel/cilta-cel
  • Testing safety and dosage of forimtamig in relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma treatment

    This study is all about exploring a new drug called forimtamig’s safety and how the body deals with it when given in increasing doses to people who have a condition called multiple myeloma. The study involves a gradual increase in the dosage of forimtamig to identify the optimal dose that balances safety and effectiveness. The trial comprises two phases: the initial stage focuses on determining the highest dose tolerable without excessive side effects (dose-escalation). Subsequently, the identified dose will be examined on a larger group of individuals (dose expansion) to confirm its safety and assess its therapeutic benefits.

    • Forimtamig
  • Testing mezigdomide with other drugs for Multiple Myeloma

    This trial is trying to investigate a new way to fight Multiple Myeloma, a type of blood cancer. The researchers are comparing two treatments: carfilzomib and dexamethasone, and the other is these two drugs plus a new one called mezigdomide. The main goal is to see which approach works better. To figure this out, The researchers will be looking at things like how many people get better, and how completely their cancer disappears. Also, it is important to pay attention to how patients are feeling overall and various daily things like appetite and energy.

    • mezigdomide
    • Carfilzomib
    • Dexamethasone
  • Testing Isatuximab therapy for seniors with new Myeloma Diagnosis

    This medical study is about a new treatment for elderly people (70 years old or more) with a disease called multiple myeloma (MM), a type of bone marrow cancer. Normally, patients with MM are treated with two drugs: lenalidomide and dexamethasone (Rd). This study wants to find out if a new drug, called isatuximab, when added to Rd can help more. The study will look at two groups: one receiving the normal Rd and another receiving isatuximab with Rd. The research is aiming to find out if isatuximab can help patients go into deeper remission, stay healthy longer, and ultimately lead to a better quality of life.

    • Isatuximab
    • Dexamethasone
    • Lenalidomide
  • Comparing idecabtagene vicleucel and lenalidomide therapy for Multiple Myeloma

    This study involves the comparison of two treatments to assess their effectiveness, safety, and tolerability in adults with multiple myeloma who did not achieve complete recovery after a stem cell transplant. One treatment, referred to as ‘ide-cel’ (idecabtagene vicleucel), is administered in combination with another medication called lenalidomide. The alternative treatment involves the use of lenalidomide alone. The study is an open experiment, meaning the assigned treatment is known. The primary objectives include evaluating the efficacy of the treatments, assessing their safety, and gauging the participants’ tolerance. Additionally, the study will monitor general well-being, considering factors such as strength, fatigue, pain, and any symptoms or side effects experienced.

    • idecabtagene vicleucel
    • Fludarabine
    • Lenalidomide
    • Cyclophosphamide
  • Testing drug combinations in recurring multiple myeloma

    This is a type of research study where the researchers compare two different treatments for multiple myeloma, a type of cancer in your blood. In the study, people will be placed into different groups and receive either a combination of iberdomide, daratumumab, and dexamethasone, or another combination of daratumumab, bortezomib, and dexamethasone. The researchers want to check how well the cancer responds to these treatments and see which one works better.

    • Iberdomide
    • Dexamethasone
    • Bortezomib
    • Daratumumab
  • Comparing two medicine combinations for treating multiple myeloma

    This study is for patients with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM), a type of cancer affecting plasma cells in the bone marrow. The research compares two treatment combinations: Mezigdomide with Bortezomib and Dexamethasone (MEZIVd) versus Pomalidomide with Bortezomib and Dexamethasone (PVd). The main goal is to see which combination is more effective in controlling the disease. Patients will be randomly assigned to one of the two treatment groups. Their health, response to treatment, and any side effects will be closely monitored. The study aims to improve treatment for RRMM by finding the most effective medication combination. Participation in this study may offer patients access to new therapies and contribute to medical research that can benefit others with the same condition.

    • mezigdomide
    • Pomalidomide
    • Dexamethasone
    • Bortezomib
  • Testing the efficacy of teclistamab vs other drugs for relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma treatment

    The study is evaluating a treatment for a blood cancer known as multiple myeloma. Two different treatments are being compared to assess their effectiveness in both slowing down the disease and minimizing side effects. The first treatment involves a single medicine called teclistamab, while the second offers a choice between two combinations of multiple medicines (either PVd – pomalidomide, bortezomib, dexamethasone or Kd – carfilzomib, dexamethasone). Both treatments have been previously administered to individuals with similar conditions. Individuals who have undergone prior treatment, including the use of an anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody and lenalidomide, but experienced a recurrence or lack of resolution of the disease, are eligible to participate in this study. The objective is to determine the duration it takes for the disease to progress under different treatments. Additionally, the study will monitor changes in health and potential medication-related issues through regular check-ups.

    • Carfilzomib
    • Pomalidomide
    • Teclistamab
    • Dexamethasone
    • Bortezomib
  • Comparing two maintenance drugs in treating new Multiple Myeloma post-transplant

    This clinical study is for adults with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma who have had a stem cell transplant. It compares two maintenance therapies: iberdomide and lenalidomide. The aim is to determine which therapy is more effective in preventing cancer progression after the transplant. Participants will receive one of these drugs and be closely monitored for their response and any side effects. This study is crucial for finding better post-transplant care options for multiple myeloma patients, potentially improving their long-term outcomes.

    • Iberdomide
    • Lenalidomide
  • Comparison of elranatamab and lenalidomide for new multiple myeloma patients

    This study compares the effects of two different drugs- elranatamab and lenalidomide, on patients diagnosed with a type of cancer called Multiple Myeloma after undergoing autologous stem cell transplant. Some people will get a medicine named elranatamab at the clinic where the study takes place, this drug is given through an injection underneath the skin. Others will take Lenalidomide once daily at home. The doctors want to see if elranatamab can provide more help to patients than lenalidomide. The study will last about five years. The effects will be measured in different ways, including seeing how long patients live without their disease getting worse and how well the body responds to the treatment.

    • Elranatamab
    • Lenalidomide