Clinical trials located in

Zaragoza

Zaragoza city is located in Spain. Currently, 6 clinical trials are being conducted in this city.

  • CT-EU-00117573

    To evaluate a combination of 3 different drugs versus 2 other drugs in the treatment of patients with melanoma

    This study compares two different approaches to treating advanced melanoma, a type of skin cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. This study is specifically aimed at patients with a gene mutation called BRAF who have previously received treatment with drugs such as nivolumab or pembrolizumab.

    One therapeutic approach involves taking three study drugs: pembrolizumab administered intravenously every 3 weeks, along with encorafenib and binimetinib taken orally daily at home. The second approach involves taking two study drugs: ipilimumab and nivolumab administered intravenously every 3 weeks for the first 4 doses, followed by nivolumab alone every 4 weeks. Both treatments will last for approximately 2 years, but there is no time limit for treatment with encorafenib and binimetinib.

    The research team will closely monitor the patients’ health during regular clinic visits to see how they are responding to treatment. The main goal is to determine which treatment method is more effective in shrinking or eliminating melanoma tumors.

    • Nivolumab
    • Ipilimumab
    • Binimetinib
    • Encorafenib
    • Pembrolizumab
  • Study of an experimental drug TL-895 for myelofibrosis or indolent systemic mastocytosis

    This here clinical trial is studying a new experimental drug called TL-895. TL-895 is taken by mouth and works by blocking certain proteins called tyrosine kinases that are involved in causing myelofibrosis and indolent systemic mastocytosis.

    Participants in the study will receive TL-895 orally in varying doses based on their specific group assignment. These doses range from 150 mg to 450 mg, and the administration could be either once or twice daily, continuing in a consistent 28-day cycle. The primary goal of the study is to determine the recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) for TL-895 in each patient group based on safety and tolerability data. Additionally, the study aims to assess the effectiveness of TL-895 in reducing spleen volume and improving symptoms associated with Myelofibrosis over a 24-week period.

    • TL-895
  • To evaluate the effectiveness of nivolumab used alone and in combination with HBI-8000 in the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma

    This is a study comparing two treatment options for patients with melanoma that cannot be surgically removed or has spread to other parts of the body. One treatment option is an investigational drug called Tucidinostat (HBI-8000) taken by mouth twice a week in combination with an approved drug called nivolumab given by intravenous infusion. Another option is a placebo taken orally twice a week, also in combination with nivolumab given by intravenous infusion.

    The primary goal of the study is to determine whether the combination of HBI-8000 and nivolumab is more effective than nivolumab alone in shrinking the tumor or preventing further tumor progression. The study will also assess the safety of the treatment combinations.

    Patients enrolled in the main study will be randomly assigned to receive either the HBI-8000 combination or a placebo combination. Treatment will continue for up to 2 years or until the cancer progresses, side effects worsen or the patient decides to withdraw from the study. The study will last up to 4 years and will include regular monitoring and follow-up visits.

    • Placebo
    • Tudicdinostat/HBI-8000
  • Study of KRT-232 Combined with Ruxolitinib for Myelofibrosis Patients

    This here clinical trial is looking at a new drug called KRT-232 that’s taken by mouth. The study aims to see if combining KRT-232 with the existing drug ruxolitinib can help folks with myelofibrosis who ain’t responding well enough to just taking ruxolitinib alone.

    The main goal in the first part of the study is to find the right dose of KRT-232 to use when combined with ruxolitinib. They’ll be looking closely at any side effects to make sure the dose is safe. In the second part, they’ll check if the combination of the two drugs can shrink the size of the spleen by at least 35% after 6 months of treatment.

    • KRT-232
    • Ruxolitinib
  • Study of TL-895 Combined with Ruxolitinib for Myelofibrosis Treatment

    This here clinical trial is studying a new experimental drug called TL-895 for the treatment of myelofibrosis. TL-895 works by blocking certain proteins called tyrosine kinases that are involved in the growth of cancer cells. The study is open to folks who have myelofibrosis, including primary myelofibrosis, post-polycythemia vera myelofibrosis, or post-essential thrombocythemia myelofibrosis.

    Participants in the study will take TL-895 along with another drug called ruxolitinib, which is already approved for treating myelofibrosis. Ruxolitinib, also known as Jakafi or Jakavi, works by blocking different proteins called Janus kinases that are also involved in cancer growth.

    The main goal of the study is to find the best dose of TL-895 to use with ruxolitinib that is both safe and effective. In the first part, different doses of TL-895 will be tested to determine the highest dose that can be tolerated without causing too many side effects. Then in the second part, the recommended dose will be given to all participants, and the researchers will measure how well the combination of drugs reduces spleen size after 24 weeks of treatment.

    So in a nutshell, this study aims to test a new targeted therapy for myelofibrosis by combining it with an existing approved drug, with the hope of improving treatment outcomes for patients with this serious blood disorder.

    • TL-895
    • Ruxolitinib
  • Study on Ravulizumab’s effect on Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy

    The study is looking into the effectiveness of a medication called ravulizumab for adults who have a kidney condition known as Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy (IgAN). This condition can lead to kidney damage over time, and the study aims to find out if ravulizumab can help reduce the amount of protein lost in urine—a common problem in IgAN—and slow down the decrease in kidney function.

    In this study, about 450 participants who are at a high risk of their disease getting worse will be chosen. These participants must have been on stable treatment for their IgAN for at least three months before the study starts. They will then receive either ravulizumab or a placebo, which is a treatment with no active drug, through an IV infusion based on their weight. The main goal is to see if those who receive ravulizumab have a significant improvement in their condition compared to those who receive the placebo.

    The study will have two main checkpoints. The first one, at Week 34, will check how much protein is in the urine, and the second one, at Week 106, will assess how well the kidneys are filtering waste from the blood. Additionally, a smaller group of participants with more advanced kidney issues will receive ravulizumab to further explore its effects.

    After the study ends at Week 106, participants will have the option to continue receiving ravulizumab in a follow-up period to see how long-term treatment affects their condition. This study is a chance for people with IgAN to potentially slow down their disease progression and improve their quality of life.

    • placebo
    • Ravulizumab

See more clinical trials in other cities in Spain:

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