Clinical trials located in

Warszawa

Warszawa city is located in Poland. Currently, 11 clinical trials are being conducted in this city.

  • Evaluating a dual anticoagulant therapy for patients with atrial fibrillation and acute coronary syndrome after percutaneous coronary intervention

    This study focuses on patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who have undergone a procedure called percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The therapy being tested involves a combination of drugs to prevent blood clots and manage heart health after PCI.

    Patients with both AF and ACS face a challenge: preventing clots while avoiding excessive bleeding. Standard practice often includes three drugs: an oral anticoagulant (OAC) to prevent stroke, aspirin, and clopidogrel. However, using all three drugs together can lead to a high risk of bleeding within a year.

    The study aims to find out if using just two drugs—dabigatran and ticagrelor—can be as safe and effective as the standard three-drug therapy. This approach is called a dual anticoagulant regimen. Participants in the study will be men and women aged 18 and older who have nonvalvular AF and have successfully undergone PCI for ACS. They will be randomly assigned to one of two groups: one group will receive dabigatran and ticagrelor, while the other group will receive dabigatran, clopidogrel, and aspirin. The treatment will last for 12 months.

    The main goal of the study is to see if the dual therapy is as good as the triple therapy in preventing major bleeding and cardiovascular events like heart attacks and strokes. The study also looks at other outcomes, such as death and the need for additional heart procedures. This research will provide important information about a new treatment strategy that could improve safety and effectiveness for patients with AF and ACS who undergo PCI.

  • Study of ustekinumab and guselkumab in young patients with juvenile psoriatic arthritis

    This here clinical trial is aimin’ to study two different medicines, ustekinumab and guselkumab, for treatin’ a condition called juvenile psoriatic arthritis. This is a type of arthritis that affects young’uns and causes joint pain, swellin’, and stiffness.

    The study will have two groups, one group takin’ ustekinumab and the other takin’ guselkumab. These medicines work by targetin’ certain proteins in the body that cause inflammation, which is the root cause of the arthritis symptoms.

    The main goal of the study is to see how well these medicines work in reducin’ the symptoms of juvenile psoriatic arthritis, like joint pain and swellin’. The study will also look at how the body handles these medicines and if they cause any side effects.

    The study will last for about a year and a half, with regular check-ups and assessments to monitor the participants’ progress.

    • Ustekinumab
    • Guselkumab
  • Study of Pembrolizumab/Quavonlimab Combination vs Other Treatments for Colorectal Cancer

    This here clinical trial is aimin’ to take a good look at a new combination treatment called co-formulated pembrolizumab/quavonlimab for folks with stage IV colorectal cancer that’s got that microsatellite instability-high or mismatch repair deficient business goin’ on. The main goal is to see how well this new combo treatment works at shrinkin’ them tumors, compared to some other treatments out there.

    Now, the real important part is that the doctors’ll be keepin’ a close eye on how many folks get what they call an objective response, meanin’ their tumors either disappear completely or shrink down by at least 30%. They’ll be trackin’ this over a span of up to around 50 months to get a good picture of how effective this new treatment is.

    Safety’s always a top priority too, so the doctors’ll be watchin’ out for any side effects or issues that might crop up with this new combo treatment. It’s all about findin’ the best way to fight that cancer while keepin’ folks as comfortable as possible.

  • To evaluate a combination of 3 different drugs versus 2 other drugs in the treatment of patients with melanoma

    This study compares two different approaches to treating advanced melanoma, a type of skin cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. This study is specifically aimed at patients with a gene mutation called BRAF who have previously received treatment with drugs such as nivolumab or pembrolizumab.

    One therapeutic approach involves taking three study drugs: pembrolizumab administered intravenously every 3 weeks, along with encorafenib and binimetinib taken orally daily at home. The second approach involves taking two study drugs: ipilimumab and nivolumab administered intravenously every 3 weeks for the first 4 doses, followed by nivolumab alone every 4 weeks. Both treatments will last for approximately 2 years, but there is no time limit for treatment with encorafenib and binimetinib.

    The research team will closely monitor the patients’ health during regular clinic visits to see how they are responding to treatment. The main goal is to determine which treatment method is more effective in shrinking or eliminating melanoma tumors.

    • Nivolumab
    • Ipilimumab
    • Binimetinib
    • Encorafenib
    • Pembrolizumab
  • Study on Secukinumab for Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy

    This clinical trial evaluates the efficacy of the drug secukinumab in treating moderate to severe rotator cuff tendinopathy. Participants will receive secukinumab or a placebo, both in conjunction with standard care, to see if there is an improvement in symptoms and physical function. The research is conducted through a controlled setup where neither the participants nor the researchers know who receives the drug or the placebo to ensure unbiased results. This research aims to provide valuable insights into the potential benefits of secukinumab for those struggling with this shoulder condition.

    • placebo
    • Secukinumab
  • Safety and efficacy of pembrolizumab in combination with investigational drugs in the first-line treatment of patients with melanoma

    The aim of this study is to test new experimental treatments for melanoma, which is a type of skin cancer. The main goal is to test whether these new treatments are safe and effective when used alone or in combination with the drug pembrolizumab.

    The current study includes several different treatment groups. Some groups receive pembrolizumab in combination with other investigational drugs such as vibostolimab, quavonlimab, lenvatinib, favezelimab, or Tretynoina (ATRA). Other groups simply receive pembrolizumab alone.

    Scientists will carefully look at factors such as dose-limiting toxicities and adverse events to make sure the treatment is safe. They will also check the effectiveness of the therapy by measuring, for example, the objective response rate, which shows whether tumors are shrinking or disappearing.

    • Tretynoina
    • Vibostolimab
    • Quavonlimab
    • Favezelimab
    • Pembrolizumab
    • Lenvatinib
  • Study on combining two drugs – Fianlimab and Cemiplimab in patients with previously untreated melanoma

    This study examines two drugs, fianlimab and cemiplimab, given together for the treatment of melanoma. The main goal is to see how effective this drug combination is in treating melanoma compared with pembrolizumab, which is already approved for the treatment of melanoma in adults. The study will also look at whether there are any differences in the effects of these experimental drugs in adolescents and adults.

    Scientists also want to learn about other key issues: what side effects may occur from taking these experimental drugs, how much of the drugs enter the bloodstream over time, and whether the body produces antibodies to the drugs that could make them less effective or cause side effects. They will also check whether taking medications improves patients’ quality of life. Fianlimab and cemiplimab will be administered by intravenous infusion, and pembrolizumab will be administered by intravenous infusion.

    • placebo
    • Fianlimab
    • Cemiplimab
    • Pembrolizumab
  • Study of the drug combination mRNA-4157/V940 and Pembrolizumab in the treatment of melanoma

    The aim of this clinical trial is to test whether a new drug called mRNA-4157/V940 in combination with pembrolizumab can help prevent the recurrence of melanoma in people who have already had it. Currently, mRNA-4157/V940 is what is called “individualized neoantigen therapy,” which means it is a therapy created specifically for each patient based on their cancer cells. Doctors give this drug along with pembrolizumab, a drug that helps the immune system fight cancer cells.

    The main goal of this study is to determine whether taking V940 and pembrolizumab together is more effective in preventing melanoma recurrence than taking pembrolizumab alone. Researchers will closely monitor how long it takes for the cancer to return or spread. The study will last for approximately 74 months.

    • mRNA-4157/V940
    • placebo
    • Pembrolizumab
  • Study of the effectiveness of CPL409116 in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    A clinical trial is being presented that focuses on evaluating the efficacy and safety of a new drug called CPL409116 in individuals with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who have not achieved improvement with methotrexate alone. The study is designed to last for 12 weeks and aims to enroll approximately 100 participants, who will be divided into four groups. Each group will receive different doses of CPL409116 or a placebo, in addition to their continued methotrexate treatment.

    CPL409116 is a promising drug that works by targeting specific pathways in the body known to contribute to inflammation and RA symptoms. By inhibiting these pathways, CPL409116 could potentially reduce disease activity and improve symptoms. The main objective of this study is to determine how well CPL409116 can decrease disease activity compared to a placebo, which will be measured using the DAS28(CRP) score. This score takes into account the number of swollen or tender joints, the level of a specific protein in the blood that indicates inflammation, and how the patient assesses their disease activity.

    Participants in this study will be randomly assigned to one of the treatment groups and will take the study drug or placebo twice daily for 85 consecutive days. It is important for participants to have been on a stable dose of methotrexate for at least 12 weeks prior to joining the study, with no dosage changes for at least 8 weeks before the study begins.

    This study aims not only to evaluate the efficacy of CPL409116 but also its safety, ensuring that it is well-tolerated by participants. If someone is struggling with active rheumatoid arthritis and has not achieved an adequate response to methotrexate, this study may provide an opportunity to access a potentially new treatment option while contributing to significant research that could benefit other individuals with RA in the future.

    • CPL409116
    • placebo
  • Comparison of zibotentan/dapagliflozin with dapagliflozin alone in the treatment of chronic kidney disease with high proteinuria

    The study aims to understand how to better treat people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and high proteinuria. This study is in its third phase and involves multiple centers where participants will be closely monitored. The main goal is to compare the effectiveness, safety, and how well participants tolerate a combination treatment of zibotentan/dapagliflozin versus dapagliflozin alone.

    During this study, participants will be randomly assigned to one of two groups. One group will receive the combination of zibotentan and dapagliflozin, while the other group will receive only dapagliflozin. Both treatments aim to slow down the decline in kidney function, which is a major concern for people with CKD and high proteinuria. The key measure of success for this study is the change in eGFR from baseline, which is a test used to check how well the kidneys are working, specifically by measuring the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). This will be assessed at the 24-month mark of the study.

    This research is crucial because it could lead to better treatment options for those suffering from CKD and high proteinuria, potentially improving their quality of life and health outcomes.

    • Zibotentan/Dapagliflozin
    • Dapagliflozin
  • Study on Ravulizumab’s effect on Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy

    The study is looking into the effectiveness of a medication called ravulizumab for adults who have a kidney condition known as Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy (IgAN). This condition can lead to kidney damage over time, and the study aims to find out if ravulizumab can help reduce the amount of protein lost in urine—a common problem in IgAN—and slow down the decrease in kidney function.

    In this study, about 450 participants who are at a high risk of their disease getting worse will be chosen. These participants must have been on stable treatment for their IgAN for at least three months before the study starts. They will then receive either ravulizumab or a placebo, which is a treatment with no active drug, through an IV infusion based on their weight. The main goal is to see if those who receive ravulizumab have a significant improvement in their condition compared to those who receive the placebo.

    The study will have two main checkpoints. The first one, at Week 34, will check how much protein is in the urine, and the second one, at Week 106, will assess how well the kidneys are filtering waste from the blood. Additionally, a smaller group of participants with more advanced kidney issues will receive ravulizumab to further explore its effects.

    After the study ends at Week 106, participants will have the option to continue receiving ravulizumab in a follow-up period to see how long-term treatment affects their condition. This study is a chance for people with IgAN to potentially slow down their disease progression and improve their quality of life.

    • placebo
    • Ravulizumab

See more clinical trials in other cities in Poland:

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