Clinical trials located in

Toulouse

Toulouse city is located in France. Currently, 20 clinical trials are being conducted in this city.

Toulouse, known as “La Ville Rose” due to its distinctive terracotta brick architecture, is a vibrant city in southern France. It is the fourth-largest city in the country and serves as the capital of the Occitanie region. Toulouse is renowned for its rich history, dating back to the Roman era, and its significant role in the aerospace industry, housing the headquarters of Airbus. The city boasts a unique blend of ancient and modern, with its historic center, bustling markets, and cutting-edge space exploration facilities. Toulouse also enjoys a lively cultural scene, with numerous festivals, theaters, and museums, including the Foundation Bemberg and the Toulouse Space Center.

  • CT-EU-00121743

    Study comparing Giredestrant and Fulvestrant with CDK4/6 Inhibitors for advanced breast cancer

    This study focuses on a type of advanced breast cancer known as Estrogen Receptor-Positive (ER+), HER2-Negative breast cancer. This kind of cancer is driven by hormones and does not have high levels of the HER2 protein. The study aims to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a new drug called Giredestrant compared to an existing drug called Fulvestrant. Both drugs will be combined with one of three medicines that inhibit proteins in cancer cells called CDK4/6 inhibitors (Palbociclib, Ribociclib, or Abemaciclib).

    In this study, participants will be randomly assigned to one of two groups. One group will receive Giredestrant and the other will receive Fulvestrant. Both groups will also receive one of the CDK4/6 inhibitors chosen by their doctor. These combinations are being tested to see which works better to stop the cancer from growing or spreading.

    The drugs involved include Giredestrant (RO7197597, RG6171, GDC-9545), Fulvestrant, Abemaciclib, Palbociclib, Ribociclib, and LHRH Agonist (for pre/perimenopausal women and men).

    The goal is to find out if Giredestrant can provide better results and fewer side effects compared to Fulvestrant when both are combined with one of the CDK4/6 inhibitors. The study may involve regular tests and assessments to monitor the cancer’s progress and the patient’s response to the treatment.

    Participants will continue to receive the study drugs as long as they are benefiting from them and not experiencing unacceptable side effects. The study involves close monitoring to ensure the safety and well-being of all participants throughout the treatment period.

    • LHRH Agonist
    • Abemaciclib
    • Giredestrant
    • Palbociclib
    • Ribociclib
    • Fulvestrant
  • Study on the effectiveness and safety of Ianalumab for treating Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    This clinical trial is designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a drug called ianalumab in patients with warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (wAIHA) who have not responded to at least one previous treatment. The study aims to determine if ianalumab can induce and maintain a durable hemoglobin response compared to a placebo.

    Participants will be randomly assigned to receive one of two different doses of ianalumab or a placebo. If a participant assigned to the placebo group does not respond to the treatment, they may be given ianalumab in an open-label manner, meaning both the participant and the doctor will know they are receiving the drug.

    The investigational treatment will be administered through an intravenous (i.v.) infusion. During the study, participants will have regular visits every other week during the treatment period and primary endpoint follow-up period. For safety monitoring, visits will occur monthly for the first 20 weeks after the last dose and then quarterly for up to two years. If a participant achieves a durable response, additional monthly visits for efficacy will continue for the first two years after the last dose, followed by quarterly visits until the loss of response or the end of the study, which could be up to 39 months after the last participant is randomized.

    The primary goal is to see if ianalumab can achieve a durable hemoglobin response, defined as a hemoglobin level of at least 10 g/dL and an increase of at least 2 g/dL from baseline for a period of at least eight consecutive weeks between weeks 9 and 25, without the need for rescue medication or prohibited treatment.

    This study offers hope for patients with wAIHA who have not found success with other treatments, providing a potential new option to manage their condition.

    • placebo
  • Study of Elafibranor in the treatment of adult patients with Primary Biliary Cholangitis (PBC)

    The clinical trial is aimed at adult patients with confirmed primary cholangitis (PBC). Patients with this condition have an inadequate response or intolerance to ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a drug used to treat PBC.

    Primary cholangitis is a disease that slowly progresses and leads to damage to the bile ducts in the liver. This causes a build-up of bile acids, which further damages the liver. As the disease progresses, scarring of the liver may develop (cirrhosis). PBC is also associated with numerous symptoms, such as itching and fatigue, and may lead to the need for a liver transplant.

    The study evaluates the effectiveness and safety of a drug called elafibranor at a dose of 80 mg daily. The study will compare elafibranor with a placebo, an inactive substance administered for control purposes. The main goal of the study is to test the effectiveness of elafibranor. The safety of long-term use of this medicine and its effect on symptoms such as itching and fatigue will also be checked.

    • Elafibranor
  • Testing Gantenerumab and Drug Combinations for Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease in Families with Genetic Mutations

    This study focuses on Alzheimer’s disease, particularly an early onset type caused by a genetic mutation inherited dominantly. Various therapies will be tested, including Gantenerumab, Solanezumab, Etalanetug, and Lecanemab. The purpose is to assess the safety, tolerability, and effectiveness of these treatments in slowing the progression or improving markers of the disease.

    The study targets individuals who either have a mutation causing Alzheimer’s disease or are at risk of having such a mutation. Participants can be without symptoms or have mild signs of dementia. Both actual medications and placebo will be used to compare the effectiveness of the treatments.

    Gantenerumab is administered subcutaneously (under the skin) every four weeks, while Solanezumab is given through intravenous (IV) infusion every four weeks. Etalanetug and Lecanemab are also administered intravenously. The study design includes different stages, where the participants and research staff may or may not know which specific treatment the participant is receiving, depending on the mutation and the drug being tested.

    This adaptive study aims to find effective treatments by testing multiple therapies. The study will analyze biomarkers (biological markers) from imaging and body fluids and assess clinical and cognitive outcomes to see if the treatments are working on a biological and clinical level. After the main treatment phase, there is an option for participants to receive the active drug in an open-label extension phase.

    • Etalanetug
    • Gantenerumab
    • Solanezumab
    • Lecanemab
  • Study of infigratinib in children with achondroplasia

    The clinical study involves children with achondroplasia who previously participated in the PROPEL study. The study evaluates infigratinib, an oral tablet medication. The goal is to assess the safety, tolerance, and effectiveness of the drug. Infigratinib targets the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), which is crucial in processes like cell growth, wound healing, and bone and blood vessel formation.

    The study is aimed at children aged 3 to 11 years who can walk unaided and take oral medication. Various doses will be adjusted based on the child’s weight. The study will assess changes in annual height growth, pharmacokinetic parameters (such as maximum drug concentration in the blood), and any adverse events. Additionally, changes in body proportions, limb length, and other growth measures will be analyzed.

    • Infigratinib
  • Isatuximab Plus Pomalidomide and Dexamethasone for AL Amyloidosis

    This clinical trial is focused on patients with AL Amyloidosis who have not achieved a very good partial response or better following previous therapies. The trial investigates the efficacy of combining Isatuximab, Pomalidomide, and Dexamethasone. The aim is to see if this drug combination can significantly reduce the levels of misfolded proteins in the blood, which are characteristic of this disease, thereby improving the condition and potentially prolonging life. This study seeks to offer a new potential treatment option for those who have limited responses to existing therapies.

    • Isatuximab
  • Study of JNJ-79635322 for Multiple Myeloma and Amyloidosis

    This study is investigating a new drug called JNJ-79635322, which is a trispecific antibody. The main goal of this study is to establish a recommended dose and schedule of drug administration that will be safe for participants. This medicine is intended for people with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma or previously treated light chain (AL) amyloidosis.

    In the first part of the study, called dose escalation, doctors will gradually increase the dose of the medicine to find the highest dose that is well tolerated. In the second part, called dose expansion, the medicine will be administered at a previously established dose and doctors will monitor the safety and tolerability of the medicine in different groups of patients.

    JNJ-79635322 will be administered as a subcutaneous injection. During the study, doctors will carefully monitor any side effects and abnormal laboratory test results. The most important thing is to ensure the safety of participants and find the optimal dose of the drug.

    • JNJ-79635322
  • Study assessing the effectiveness of Tebentafusp administered alone and in combination with Pembrolizumab in the treatment of advanced melanoma

    The aim of this study is to test new treatments for people with advanced skin melanoma that does not respond well to other therapies. The main focus was on a new experimental drug called tebentafusp, which is a special type of protein that helps the body’s immune system recognize and attack cancer cells.

    The study divided patients into three different groups. One group will receive tebentafusp alone. Another group will receive tebentafusp in combination with another immunotherapy drug called pembrolizumab. The third group will receive the treatment that the doctor thinks is best for the patient – this could be another experimental drug, standard therapy, or simply supportive care.

    Scientists are primarily focusing on the effectiveness of these treatments in shrinking tumors and extending patient survival. They will also monitor closely for any side effects to make sure the treatment is safe. The study is expected to last about two years and will include frequent check-ins to monitor patient responses.

    • Tebentafusp
    • Pembrolizumab
  • NCT05668585

    This is a Phase 1/2 clinical trial looking at a new investigational drug called CFT1946 for treating certain types of solid tumors that have a specific genetic mutation called BRAF V600. This includes cancers like melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer, colorectal cancer, and a type of thyroid cancer called anaplastic thyroid cancer.

    In the first part of the study, called Phase 1, the main goals are to determine the highest safe dose of CFT1946 that can be given and to look at side effects. CFT1946 will be given by itself (monotherapy) or combined with two other approved drugs, trametinib or cetuximab.

    If safe doses are found in Phase 1, the study will then move to Phase 2. In this part, the main goals are to see if the treatments shrink tumors, measured by overall response rate and disease control rate, and how long any responses last, called duration of response.

    The study involves taking CFT1946 and possibly the other drugs by mouth or intravenously on a set schedule, along with regular monitoring, scans, and blood tests. Participation could last up to around 43 months.

    • CFT1946
    • Trametinib
    • Cetuximab
  • Combining Azacitidine and Venetoclax for Higher-Risk Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    The AVENHIR study is an open-label clinical trial for patients with higher-risk chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, a type of blood cancer. This study will evaluate the effectiveness and safety of combining two drugs: Azacitidine and Venetoclax (also known as ABT-199). Azacitidine is a chemotherapy drug, while Venetoclax is a targeted therapy that works by blocking a specific protein in cancer cells.

    The main goals of the study are to determine the overall response rate to this drug combination, which means how many patients achieve complete remission, partial remission, or clinical benefit. The study will also closely monitor safety and any potential dose-limiting side effects during the first two treatment cycles.

    To be eligible for this study, patients must be newly diagnosed with higher-risk chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and have not received any prior treatment with hypomethylating agents like Azacitidine.

    • Venetoclax
  • Study Comparing Asciminib and Nilotinib for Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    This study examines the effects and tolerance of two drugs, asciminib and nilotinib, for treating a specific type of leukemia called Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in its chronic phase. The participants are adults who have been newly diagnosed and have not received previous treatment for this condition. They will be randomly assigned to receive either asciminib or nilotinib. The study aims to see which drug is better tolerated and how effective they are. Throughout the study, participants will be monitored for any side effects and the progress of their treatment until they either experience significant side effects, the disease progresses, or they decide to stop the treatment. Follow-up checks will also be conducted after the treatment ends.

    • Asciminib
    • Nilotinib
  • Exploring a new treatment combination for rheumatoid arthritis: baricitinib plus anti-TNF

    This clinical trial is focused on finding a more effective treatment for people with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) who haven’t responded well to previous therapies. The study is comparing two different approaches: one group will receive a combination of baricitinib treatment and an anti-TNF therapy (adalimumab), while the other group will receive baricitinib along with a placebo. The main goal is to see which group shows a greater improvement in their RA symptoms, specifically looking for a 50% improvement in symptoms, known as an ACR 50 response, after 24 weeks from the start of the treatment.

    Baricitinib is a medication that targets certain pathways in the body’s immune system to reduce inflammation and pain in RA. Anti-TNF therapy, like adalimumab, works by blocking the action of a protein in the body that causes inflammation. By combining these two treatments, researchers hope to see a more significant improvement in RA symptoms than with baricitinib alone.

    The trial is important because it aims to provide a new option for patients with RA who have not found relief with current treatments. It’s designed to test the safety and effectiveness of using these two different types of medications together.

    • placebo
    • Adalimumab
    • Baricitinib
  • Study on Ravulizumab’s effect on Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy

    The study is looking into the effectiveness of a medication called ravulizumab for adults who have a kidney condition known as Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy (IgAN). This condition can lead to kidney damage over time, and the study aims to find out if ravulizumab can help reduce the amount of protein lost in urine—a common problem in IgAN—and slow down the decrease in kidney function.

    In this study, about 450 participants who are at a high risk of their disease getting worse will be chosen. These participants must have been on stable treatment for their IgAN for at least three months before the study starts. They will then receive either ravulizumab or a placebo, which is a treatment with no active drug, through an IV infusion based on their weight. The main goal is to see if those who receive ravulizumab have a significant improvement in their condition compared to those who receive the placebo.

    The study will have two main checkpoints. The first one, at Week 34, will check how much protein is in the urine, and the second one, at Week 106, will assess how well the kidneys are filtering waste from the blood. Additionally, a smaller group of participants with more advanced kidney issues will receive ravulizumab to further explore its effects.

    After the study ends at Week 106, participants will have the option to continue receiving ravulizumab in a follow-up period to see how long-term treatment affects their condition. This study is a chance for people with IgAN to potentially slow down their disease progression and improve their quality of life.

    • placebo
    • Ravulizumab
  • CT-EU-00083874

    Study to find the best way to administer pegaspargase in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    This is a study to investigate treatment strategies for children and adolescents diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The study focuses on evaluating the efficacy of a drug called pegaspargase. The drug works by depriving tumor cells of essential nutrients, contributing to its potential efficacy against ALL in pediatric patients. The study aims to determine the optimal way to administer pegaspargase, comparing a single high dose with two lower doses, with additional doses later in treatment. For those at highest risk, a more intensive treatment plan is being investigated. This includes two larger initial doses, followed by additional doses later in treatment. The study is evaluating factors such as potential serious side effects and overall treatment efficacy.

    • pegaspargase
  • CT-EU-00091440

    Investigating new drug, JNJ-75276617 for the treatment of patients with acute leukemia

    This study is about a new medicine called JNJ-75276617, designed to help patients with a type of blood cancer called Acute Leukemia. Acute leukemia is an illness where the bone marrow makes too many white blood cells that are abnormal. This study is divided into two parts: first, to figure out the best dose of the new medicine, and second, to check if it’s safe at that dose. For up to 2 years and 10 months, researchers will follow participants closely and check for any changes in their health. They will look at the number of participants who experience bad side effects, how much of the drug is in their bodies, and how the disease is responding to the new medicine. The main goal is to find a dose of the drug that’s both safe and can possibly help patients with acute leukemia.

    • JNJ-75276617- new potential treatment for Acute myeloid leukemia
  • CT-EU-00084629

    Testing the safety and impact of a new potential drug on leukemia and lymphoma patients

    This study is designed to assess the effectiveness of a new medication, DR-01, in individuals diagnosed with Large Granular Lymphocytic Leukemia or certain forms of Lymphomas, specific types of blood cancer. DR-01 is being tested for the first time in humans across multiple centers or hospitals. The study consists of two main phases. In Phase 1, meticulous attention is devoted to scrutinizing the safety profile of DR-01 and gauging its tolerability by individuals. In Phase 2, the study examines the medication’s efficacy in combating the targeted cancer. This multifaceted approach underscores a comprehensive endeavor to unveil not only the safety but also the therapeutic potential of DR-01 in the realm of blood cancer treatment.

    • DR-01- new potential medication for Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia
  • Continued Parsaclisib treatment for B-cell cancer patients

    This is a phase II clinical trial focused on providing continuation of treatment with a drug called parsaclisib to people diagnosed with B-cell malignancies. The main goal of this study is to expand the treatment regimen established in the previous study. Study participants will receive parsaclisib as a stand-alone therapy (monotherapy) or in combination with other therapeutic agents, which may include itacitinib, ruxolitinib or ibrutinib. The study aims to facilitate participants’ ongoing care and contribute to the broader field of medical research by collecting data on the effectiveness and safety of prolonged use of parsaclisib.

    • Ibrutinib
    • Ruxolitinib
    • Itacitinib
    • Parsaclisib
  • Testing a new combination therapy with acalabrutinib for a specific type of lymphoma

    This clinical trial is investigating a new combination therapy for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, a type of lymphoma. The treatment combines Acalabrutinib, a targeted therapy drug, with R-CHOP, a chemotherapy mix consisting of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone, a standard chemotherapy regimen. The aim of the study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of this combination in improving patient outcomes. It focuses on patients who have not been previously treated for lymphoma. The study aims to find better treatment strategies for this particular type of lymphoma.

    • Prednisone
    • Vincristine
    • Doxorubicin
    • Acalabrutinib
    • Cyclophosphamide
    • Rituximab
  • Testing a new inhaled drug for pulmonary arterial hypertension

    This study focuses on the efficiency and safety of a new inhaled drug – MK-5475 – for patients suffering from Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH). The study is divided into two parts: phase 2 and phase 3. In phase 2, the researchers will compare three different doses of MK-5475 with a placebo over a base period of 12 weeks. The goal is to find out if any of the doses can decrease the patient’s pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), which is the resistance that the heart must overcome to pump blood through the lungs. In Phase 3 of the study, the best performing dose from Phase 2 will be used to confirm its long-term effectiveness, safety, and tolerability over a 12-week base period with a follow-up period of up to five years. The focus is to see if this dose is better than a placebo in improving the patient’s walking distance over 6 minutes. The study aims at improving the quality of life and physical health of PAH patients with the help of the new drug.

    • MK-5475
  • Study of GEN1047 in the treatment of malignancies with solid tumors

    The study concerns the new drug GEN1047, which is to be used in patients with various types of cancer. This medicine is an antibody, a special protein that can help the immune system fight cancer.

    The study is aimed at patients with breast cancer, endometrial (uterine lining) cancer, ovarian cancer and non-small cell lung squamous cell carcinoma (NSCLC-SCC). All participants will receive GEN1047. The main aim of the study is to assess the safety of GEN1047. The idea is to check whether the drug is safe for humans and what dose is best tolerated. A secondary goal is to evaluate how effective this drug is in treating different types of cancer.

    The study will consist of two parts. In the first part (dose escalation), the doses of the medicine will be gradually increased to find the maximum safe dose. In the second part (extension), two selected doses of the drug will be tested.

    Patients eligible for the study must have histologically or cytologically (i.e. based on the examination of cells or tissues) confirmed cancer and must have failed to respond to previous standard therapies or those therapies have proven ineffective. The study will be open-label, which means both patients and researchers will know that patients are receiving GEN1047.

    • GEN1047

See more clinical trials in other cities in France:

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