Clinical trials located in

München

München city is located in Germany. Currently, 8 clinical trials are being conducted in this city.

  • CT-EU-00121056

    Testing BI 764198 for Kidney Disease (FSGS): A 4-Month Study

    This study is focused on individuals with a kind of kidney disease called Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). The purpose is to see if a drug named BI 764198 can improve kidney health for people with FSGS. There will be three different doses of BI 764198 tested in the study.

    Participants in the study will be divided into four groups randomly. Three groups will receive different doses of BI 764198, and one group will receive a placebo. The study will last about four months. For approximately three months, participants will take a BI 764198 capsule or placebo capsule daily.

    Participants will visit the study site around ten times. It is possible to participate from home, in which case a research nurse will visit for the study visits. Kidney health will be checked by analyzing urine samples that participants collect at home. The results will be compared between the different groups at the end of the study. Throughout the study, doctors will also regularly monitor the general health of participants.

    • BI 764198
    • placebo
  • Study on Alogabat for Children and Teens with Angelman Syndrome

    This study is investigating a medication called Alogabat for children and adolescents aged 5-17 years who have Angelman Syndrome with a specific genetic deletion. The research will explore how different doses of Alogabat affect the body by measuring its concentration over time and observing any changes in brain activity and safety outcomes. The study includes several phases where doses are adjusted based on early results. This research aims to determine Alogabat’s effectiveness in treating symptoms of Angelman Syndrome in younger populations.

    • Alogabat
  • Study of the drug combination mRNA-4157/V940 and Pembrolizumab in the treatment of melanoma

    The aim of this clinical trial is to test whether a new drug called mRNA-4157/V940 in combination with pembrolizumab can help prevent the recurrence of melanoma in people who have already had it. Currently, mRNA-4157/V940 is what is called “individualized neoantigen therapy,” which means it is a therapy created specifically for each patient based on their cancer cells. Doctors give this drug along with pembrolizumab, a drug that helps the immune system fight cancer cells.

    The main goal of this study is to determine whether taking V940 and pembrolizumab together is more effective in preventing melanoma recurrence than taking pembrolizumab alone. Researchers will closely monitor how long it takes for the cancer to return or spread. The study will last for approximately 74 months.

    • mRNA-4157/V940
    • placebo
    • Pembrolizumab
  • Comparison of zibotentan/dapagliflozin with dapagliflozin alone in the treatment of chronic kidney disease with high proteinuria

    The study aims to understand how to better treat people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and high proteinuria. This study is in its third phase and involves multiple centers where participants will be closely monitored. The main goal is to compare the effectiveness, safety, and how well participants tolerate a combination treatment of zibotentan/dapagliflozin versus dapagliflozin alone.

    During this study, participants will be randomly assigned to one of two groups. One group will receive the combination of zibotentan and dapagliflozin, while the other group will receive only dapagliflozin. Both treatments aim to slow down the decline in kidney function, which is a major concern for people with CKD and high proteinuria. The key measure of success for this study is the change in eGFR from baseline, which is a test used to check how well the kidneys are working, specifically by measuring the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). This will be assessed at the 24-month mark of the study.

    This research is crucial because it could lead to better treatment options for those suffering from CKD and high proteinuria, potentially improving their quality of life and health outcomes.

    • Zibotentan/Dapagliflozin
    • Dapagliflozin
  • Study on Ravulizumab’s effect on Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy

    The study is looking into the effectiveness of a medication called ravulizumab for adults who have a kidney condition known as Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy (IgAN). This condition can lead to kidney damage over time, and the study aims to find out if ravulizumab can help reduce the amount of protein lost in urine—a common problem in IgAN—and slow down the decrease in kidney function.

    In this study, about 450 participants who are at a high risk of their disease getting worse will be chosen. These participants must have been on stable treatment for their IgAN for at least three months before the study starts. They will then receive either ravulizumab or a placebo, which is a treatment with no active drug, through an IV infusion based on their weight. The main goal is to see if those who receive ravulizumab have a significant improvement in their condition compared to those who receive the placebo.

    The study will have two main checkpoints. The first one, at Week 34, will check how much protein is in the urine, and the second one, at Week 106, will assess how well the kidneys are filtering waste from the blood. Additionally, a smaller group of participants with more advanced kidney issues will receive ravulizumab to further explore its effects.

    After the study ends at Week 106, participants will have the option to continue receiving ravulizumab in a follow-up period to see how long-term treatment affects their condition. This study is a chance for people with IgAN to potentially slow down their disease progression and improve their quality of life.

    • placebo
    • Ravulizumab
  • ARTEMIS study: Protecting kidney health in heart surgery patients with Ravulizumab

    The ARTEMIS study aims to find a new way to protect people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) undergoing heart surgery requiring the use of a heart-lung machine, also known as cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The main aim of this study is to see if a single dose of a drug called ravulizumab given intravenously can reduce the risk of serious kidney problems after surgery, compared with a placebo. Kidney issues are grouped under serious adverse events, and investigators will monitor them for up to 90 days after surgery. The study is carefully controlled and participants will not know whether they are receiving ravulizumab or a placebo to ensure the results are unbiased. This is an important test for people with chronic kidney disease undergoing heart surgery because it may lead to better outcomes and a lower risk of kidney damage after surgery.

    • placebo
    • Ravulizumab
  • Study of belzutifan for treating advanced cancers

    This clinical trial aim is to test out a new drug called belzutifan, also known as MK-6482 or WELIREG™. It’s a pill patient can take once a day, and the main goal is to see if it can shrink or get rid of tumors in folks with certain types of cancer.

    The cancers the researchers are looking at are pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma, which are tumors that start in the adrenal glands or nervous system. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, tumors related to von Hippel-Lindau disease, advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors, and other solid tumors with certain genetic changes that involve a protein called HIF-2α, there will be also tested.

    The big thing the researchers are  keeping an eye on is the objective response rate, which means how many folks see their tumors shrink or disappear completely while taking this drug. The researchers will be watching closely for any side effects too, of course, to make sure this new medicine is safe.

    • Belzutifan
  • A study of cabozantinib in the treatment of advanced adrenocortical carcinoma

    This trial is focused on a medication called Cabozantinib-s-malate for patients with Advanced Adrenocortical Carcinoma, a rare and aggressive form of cancer that affects the adrenal glands.

    The study is designed to explore the effectiveness and safety of Cabozantinib, which is taken orally at a dose of 60 mg daily. This medication has shown promise in preliminary studies, where it helped some patients by either partially reducing the cancer or stabilizing it for four months or longer.

    The main goal of this trial is to see how well patients do after 4 months of treatment with Cabozantinib, specifically looking at whether their cancer has progressed or not. This is what doctors call progression-free survival.

    This trial is an opportunity for patients with advanced Adrenocortical Carcinoma to try a new treatment option that could potentially help manage their disease better than current therapies. It’s an open-label, phase II study, which means both the researchers and participants know what treatment is being given, and it’s at a stage where the focus is on evaluating the effectiveness and safety of the medication for a specific condition.

    • Cabozantinib-s-malate

See more clinical trials in other cities in Germany:

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