Clinical trials located in

Muenchen

Muenchen city is located in Germany. Currently, 4 clinical trials are being conducted in this city.

  • CT-EU-00121743

    Study comparing Giredestrant and Fulvestrant with CDK4/6 Inhibitors for advanced breast cancer

    This study focuses on a type of advanced breast cancer known as Estrogen Receptor-Positive (ER+), HER2-Negative breast cancer. This kind of cancer is driven by hormones and does not have high levels of the HER2 protein. The study aims to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of a new drug called Giredestrant compared to an existing drug called Fulvestrant. Both drugs will be combined with one of three medicines that inhibit proteins in cancer cells called CDK4/6 inhibitors (Palbociclib, Ribociclib, or Abemaciclib).

    In this study, participants will be randomly assigned to one of two groups. One group will receive Giredestrant and the other will receive Fulvestrant. Both groups will also receive one of the CDK4/6 inhibitors chosen by their doctor. These combinations are being tested to see which works better to stop the cancer from growing or spreading.

    The drugs involved include Giredestrant (RO7197597, RG6171, GDC-9545), Fulvestrant, Abemaciclib, Palbociclib, Ribociclib, and LHRH Agonist (for pre/perimenopausal women and men).

    The goal is to find out if Giredestrant can provide better results and fewer side effects compared to Fulvestrant when both are combined with one of the CDK4/6 inhibitors. The study may involve regular tests and assessments to monitor the cancer’s progress and the patient’s response to the treatment.

    Participants will continue to receive the study drugs as long as they are benefiting from them and not experiencing unacceptable side effects. The study involves close monitoring to ensure the safety and well-being of all participants throughout the treatment period.

    • LHRH Agonist
    • Abemaciclib
    • Giredestrant
    • Palbociclib
    • Ribociclib
    • Fulvestrant
  • Testing Gantenerumab and Drug Combinations for Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease in Families with Genetic Mutations

    This study focuses on Alzheimer’s disease, particularly an early onset type caused by a genetic mutation inherited dominantly. Various therapies will be tested, including Gantenerumab, Solanezumab, Etalanetug, and Lecanemab. The purpose is to assess the safety, tolerability, and effectiveness of these treatments in slowing the progression or improving markers of the disease.

    The study targets individuals who either have a mutation causing Alzheimer’s disease or are at risk of having such a mutation. Participants can be without symptoms or have mild signs of dementia. Both actual medications and placebo will be used to compare the effectiveness of the treatments.

    Gantenerumab is administered subcutaneously (under the skin) every four weeks, while Solanezumab is given through intravenous (IV) infusion every four weeks. Etalanetug and Lecanemab are also administered intravenously. The study design includes different stages, where the participants and research staff may or may not know which specific treatment the participant is receiving, depending on the mutation and the drug being tested.

    This adaptive study aims to find effective treatments by testing multiple therapies. The study will analyze biomarkers (biological markers) from imaging and body fluids and assess clinical and cognitive outcomes to see if the treatments are working on a biological and clinical level. After the main treatment phase, there is an option for participants to receive the active drug in an open-label extension phase.

    • Etalanetug
    • Gantenerumab
    • Solanezumab
    • Lecanemab
  • Study of Pembrolizumab/Quavonlimab Combination vs Other Treatments for Colorectal Cancer

    This here clinical trial is aimin’ to take a good look at a new combination treatment called co-formulated pembrolizumab/quavonlimab for folks with stage IV colorectal cancer that’s got that microsatellite instability-high or mismatch repair deficient business goin’ on. The main goal is to see how well this new combo treatment works at shrinkin’ them tumors, compared to some other treatments out there.

    Now, the real important part is that the doctors’ll be keepin’ a close eye on how many folks get what they call an objective response, meanin’ their tumors either disappear completely or shrink down by at least 30%. They’ll be trackin’ this over a span of up to around 50 months to get a good picture of how effective this new treatment is.

    Safety’s always a top priority too, so the doctors’ll be watchin’ out for any side effects or issues that might crop up with this new combo treatment. It’s all about findin’ the best way to fight that cancer while keepin’ folks as comfortable as possible.

  • Study Comparing Asciminib and Nilotinib for Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    This study examines the effects and tolerance of two drugs, asciminib and nilotinib, for treating a specific type of leukemia called Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in its chronic phase. The participants are adults who have been newly diagnosed and have not received previous treatment for this condition. They will be randomly assigned to receive either asciminib or nilotinib. The study aims to see which drug is better tolerated and how effective they are. Throughout the study, participants will be monitored for any side effects and the progress of their treatment until they either experience significant side effects, the disease progresses, or they decide to stop the treatment. Follow-up checks will also be conducted after the treatment ends.

    • Asciminib
    • Nilotinib

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