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Clinical trials located in

Marseille

Marseille city is located in France. Currently, 20 clinical trials are being conducted in this city.

Marseille, France’s oldest city, was founded by Greek sailors in 600 BC. Nestled by the Mediterranean, it boasts the vibrant Vieux-Port, famed for its fish market. The city’s multicultural tapestry is reflected in its diverse neighborhoods and culinary scenes. Marseille is also the gateway to the Calanques, a stunning national park of dramatic cliffs and azure waters. The Notre-Dame de la Garde basilica, perched on a hilltop, offers panoramic views of this dynamic city, which inspired the French national anthem, “La Marseillaise.”

  • CT-EU-00112395

    Study of belzutifan for treating advanced cancers

    This clinical trial aim is to test out a new drug called belzutifan, also known as MK-6482 or WELIREG™. It’s a pill patient can take once a day, and the main goal is to see if it can shrink or get rid of tumors in folks with certain types of cancer.

    The cancers the researchers are looking at are pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma, which are tumors that start in the adrenal glands or nervous system. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, tumors related to von Hippel-Lindau disease, advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors, and other solid tumors with certain genetic changes that involve a protein called HIF-2α, there will be also tested.

    The big thing the researchers are  keeping an eye on is the objective response rate, which means how many folks see their tumors shrink or disappear completely while taking this drug. The researchers will be watching closely for any side effects too, of course, to make sure this new medicine is safe.

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  • Testing New Therapies for Glioblastoma Brain Cancer

    Howdy there, partner! This here trial is called the GBM AGILE study, and it’s aiming to find better treatments for a type of brain cancer called glioblastoma. Now, glioblastoma is a real tough customer, but this study is taking a new approach by testing multiple therapies all at once, both for newly diagnosed cases and for those where the cancer has come back.

    The main goal is to find treatments that work better and can be matched to different types of glioblastoma. The study uses a fancy method called Bayesian response adaptive randomization to assign folks to different treatment arms based on how well those treatments are performing. The most important measure they’re looking at is overall survival – how long patients live after starting treatment.

    Some of the therapies being tested include drugs like temozolomide, lomustine, regorafenib, paxalisib, VAL-083, VT1021, and troriluzole. These come in different forms like capsules, tablets, or infusions, and the dosages and schedules vary depending on the drug. The study is set up so that new promising therapies can be added in, and ones that aren’t working so well can be removed as the trial goes on.

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  • Study on the effectiveness of Givinostat in Non-Walking Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Patients

    This clinical trial is focused on testing the effectiveness, safety, and how well patients can tolerate a medication called Givinostat for those who have Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) and can no longer walk. The study is designed for male pediatric patients aged between 9 to less than 18 years. A total of 138 participants will be involved, and they will be divided into two groups. One group will receive Givinostat, and the other group will receive a placebo, which is a substance with no therapeutic effect, designed to mimic Givinostat. This division will be done randomly and both the patients and the doctors will not know who is receiving the actual medication and who is receiving the placebo, making this a double-blind study.

    The main goal of this study is to see if Givinostat can help reduce muscle decline in patients with DMD who cannot walk, by looking at changes in upper limb function after 18 months of treatment. The safety and tolerability of Givinostat in these patients will also be closely monitored.

    Participants will be involved in the study for about 20 to 21 months, which includes a 4-week screening period to confirm eligibility, 18 months of treatment, and a follow-up period. At the end of the treatment period, all participants, regardless of which group they were in, will have the option to join a long-term safety study where they will receive Givinostat.

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  • SPI-62 as new drug for patients with ACTH-dependent Cushing’s syndrome

    This is a study focused on a new treatment option, SPI-62, for people struggling with ACTH-independent Cushing’s Syndrome. The main aim is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of SPI-62 in treating the condition.

    SPI-62 is a drug that works by inhibiting a specific enzyme in the body, potentially reducing excessive cortisol levels that contribute to the disease. During this study, participants will receive SPI-62 in oral tablet form. Dosing will vary, starting at a lower dose and potentially increasing depending on patient response and study requirements.

    The study has been designed as a Phase 2 trial, meaning that the primary focus is on understanding how well SPI-62 can treat the symptoms of hypercortisolism and what its safety profile is. Participants will be in the study for an extended period of time, with scheduled visits at baseline and then at 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months, followed by quarterly visits. These visits are crucial to monitor health status and treatment impact.

    One of the key aspects the researchers will be looking at is the change in HbA1c levels, a marker of blood sugar control, after both 6 and 12 weeks of treatment. This will help to understand whether SPI-62 can improve diabetes or the impaired glucose tolerance that often accompanies diabetes.

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  • CT-EU-00083874

    Study to find the best way to administer pegaspargase in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    This is a study to investigate treatment strategies for children and adolescents diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The study focuses on evaluating the efficacy of a drug called pegaspargase. The drug works by depriving tumor cells of essential nutrients, contributing to its potential efficacy against ALL in pediatric patients. The study aims to determine the optimal way to administer pegaspargase, comparing a single high dose with two lower doses, with additional doses later in treatment. For those at highest risk, a more intensive treatment plan is being investigated. This includes two larger initial doses, followed by additional doses later in treatment. The study is evaluating factors such as potential serious side effects and overall treatment efficacy.

  • CT-EU-00053821

    Testing the safety and efficacy of Rapcabtagene autoleucel in combination with ibrutinib for the treatment of various leukemia

    This study is looking at a new drug called rapcabtagene autoleucel in people with different types of blood cancer. The treatment is divided into two phases. In phase I, the study is testing the safety and efficacy of the new treatment in three different patient groups. The first group is adults with CLL/SLL, a type of blood cancer that has not shown a good response to the drug ibrutinib. The second group is adults with DLBCL, another type of blood cancer, who have failed at least two other treatments and who are unable or unwilling to undergo a stem cell transplant. The third group is adults with ALL, another type of blood cancer, who have not responded to other treatments. Phase II extends Phase I, focusing on the two main groups. The aim of this part is to obtain additional information on the efficacy of the new treatment. The aim of both phases is to determine the best dose of rapcabtagene autoleucel, to see how safe it is and how well it works against these tumors. After the treatment part of the study is completed, patients will be followed up for at least two years to monitor their health status and the long-term effects of the treatment.

  • CT-EU-00091440

    Investigating new drug, JNJ-75276617 for the treatment of patients with acute leukemia

    This study is about a new medicine called JNJ-75276617, designed to help patients with a type of blood cancer called Acute Leukemia. Acute leukemia is an illness where the bone marrow makes too many white blood cells that are abnormal. This study is divided into two parts: first, to figure out the best dose of the new medicine, and second, to check if it’s safe at that dose. For up to 2 years and 10 months, researchers will follow participants closely and check for any changes in their health. They will look at the number of participants who experience bad side effects, how much of the drug is in their bodies, and how the disease is responding to the new medicine. The main goal is to find a dose of the drug that’s both safe and can possibly help patients with acute leukemia.

  • Examining capivasertib and docetaxel in advanced prostate cancer

    This trial is testing a new potential treatment for a type of advanced prostate cancer. The study will compare two combinations: one with Capivasertib and another called Docetaxel, compared with placebo (a dummy tablet with no medical effect) and Docetaxel. In addition, each study participant will receive steroid treatment and another therapy called androgen deprivation therapy. The main goal of this study is to demonstrate whether Capivasertib + Docetaxel extends patients’ lives more than placebo + Docetaxel. They will also be monitored for the time it takes for the cancer to show signs of growth again, for the pain to increase or for urinary symptoms to worsen.

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  • Stomach cancer treatment comparison: trastuzumab deruxtecan vs. ramucirumab & paclitaxel

    This is a thorough comparison study to measure the effectiveness and safety of two treatment paths. It’s designed for individuals who have experienced progression regarding a stomach (gastric) cancer, or cancer of the gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ). The study focuses on those with HER2-positive gastric or GEJ who have previously undergone a trastuzumab-containing regime but have not received further systemic therapy.The research compares the use of trastuzumab deruxtecan, a potent anti-cancer agent, and the combined use of ramucirumab and paclitaxel. The study’s primary goal is to evaluate the overall survival rate, while secondary aims involve examining progression-free survival, response duration, disease control, safety, pharmacokinetics, and immunogenicity.In the study, participants are fairly and randomly assigned to receive one of two treatments. This is crucial in understanding the superiority and safety of these treatment paths, and this knowledge may inform future approaches to treating these types of cancer.

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  • Investigating efficacy and safety of new therapy in early-stage Parkinson’s disease

    This clinical trial aims to examine BIIB122, a new medication considered to potentially slow down the progression of early-stage Parkinson’s disease in patients aged between 30–80 years old. Participants will undergo treatment with either BIIB122 or a placebo equal in appearance but devoid of actual medicine. The trial’s routine includes a single daily medication intake for a timeframe between 48 and 144 weeks. To evaluate the medication’s efficacy, patients’ symptoms and their impact on everyday life will be observed using the Movement Disorder Society-Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS). In addition to this, safety assessment of BIIB122 will be a main focus of the study. The trial treats this as a double-blind study, anonymizing whether a patient takes the BIIB122 drug or a placebo.

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  • Testing the safety and effectiveness of astegolimab for chronic lung disease

    The aim of this study is to see if a drug called astegolimab will be effective and safe in people with a lung disease called chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD. During this study, patients will be divided into 2 groups. One group of patients will receive the drug, the remaining patients will receive a placebo to compare the results. Both groups will not know what they are getting. The study was particularly interested in people suffering from COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) who smoked or still smoke and often get sick because of it.

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  • Study on new combination therapy for aggressive lymphoma

    This study is about a less common but severe form of cancer known as Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL). It is testing if a new medication called epcoritamab, given with a mix of other commonly used cancer medicines, can help control the disease better. These other medicines include rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine, and prednisone, which are often collectively referred to as R-CHOP. The study includes about 900 adults from around the world who have recently been diagnosed with this type of lymphoma. They will be split into two groups. One group will get epcoritamab with R-CHOP and then continue with epcoritamab. The other group will get R-CHOP followed by rituximab. Doctors will carefully watch for changes in the disease and for any side effects. There will be many checks on health, including medical exams, blood tests, questionnaires, and monitoring of any side effects.

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  • Assessing imatinib inhalation therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension

    This clinical study aims to evaluate the safety and efficacy of an inhaled treatment called imatinib (AV-101) for patients with Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH). The trial is divided into two parts: Phase 2b and Phase 3. In Phase 2b, researchers will test three doses of AV-101 to identify the optimal dose for Phase 3. They will check this by measuring the resistance of the lung vessels — less resistance means the medicine is working. In the following Phase 3, the primary outcome will be the change in the 6-minute walk distance after 24 weeks of treatment compared to a placebo. Participants must be between 18 and 75 years old, have a diagnosis of PAH, and meet specific criteria regarding their disease severity and concomitant therapy.

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  • Studying efficacy of volrustomig for metastatic lung cancer

    The study compared two treatments for metastatic non-small cell lung cancer: volrustomig with chemotherapy and pembrolizumab with chemotherapy. Its purpose is to determine which combination is more effective and safer. Patients will be divided into two groups. One group will receive volrustomig and chemotherapy, and the other group will receive pembrolizumab and chemotherapy. The effectiveness of treatment in each group will then be tracked using imaging tests. In addition, a group of researchers will follow each participant until the end of the study to make sure the treatment is safe and tolerable.

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  • Testing new immunotherapy combinations for non-small-cell lung cancer

    This study is testing a new treatment for non-small cell lung cancer that has not yet been treated with drugs. In the study, researchers will look at the effects of combining different immunotherapy drugs and their safety and effectiveness in treating cancer. Participants will receive various combinations of the drugs pembrolizumab, dostarlimab, belrestotug and GSK6097608. The study will last several years and will monitor the effects of different drug combinations and any potential side effects. The study aims to find new ways to treat lung cancer with fewer negative side effects.

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  • Comparing a new treatment with standard care for advanced colorectal cancer

    This research study is for people suffering from a type of bowel cancer that has spread to other parts of the body, known as ‘metastatic colorectal cancer’. The purpose of the study is to compare a new combination of medications against the regular treatments that are already in use. Patients participating in the study will be placed into two groups: one group will receive the standard treatment, and the other group will try a new combination of drugs (tucatinib, trastuzumab, and 5-Fluorouracil, leucovorin,,oxaliplatin). This study will also help to understand the side effects, which are any unexpected symptoms or changes that can occur when taking these medications. Ultimately, the goal of this study is to help learn more about which treatment is more effective in delaying the progression of the disease and improving the patients’ quality of life.

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  • Testing macitentan effects on kids’ lung pressure illness

    This study is looking to find out if a medicine named Macitentan can help slow down the progression of a lung condition known as Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) in kids. The study will be done in several places and everyone will know what treatment they receive. The researchers will compare the results of kids taking Macitentan to those receiving the usual care for PAH. They will check how the drug reacts in the body and how safe it is. The researchers will also see if it improves health outcomes like, need for a lung transplant or other treatments, and hospitalization.

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  • Study on new immunotherapy combinations for untreated advanced lung cancer

    This is a study of patients whose non-small cell lung cancer is at an advanced stage (cannot be cured by surgery or has spread to other parts of the body) and has not been previously treated. The study will test new combinations of immunotherapy (drugs that support the immune system in the fight against cancer) and compare them with a single immunotherapy drug. Scientists want to find out how well these combinations work and how safe they are. The study will also look at how the body processes these drugs. The drugs used in this study are called Belrestoug, GSK4428859A and EOS884448, but these names all refer to the same drug. Scientists will measure the effectiveness of the drugs by looking at how many patients have their cancer shrink and how long it takes for the cancer to start growing again or before the patient dies. They will also record any side effects that may occur during the study and for 90 days after the last treatment dose.

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  • Research on medicine combination for B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This study is about testing epcoritamab, a new drug for a type of blood cancer called B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma. The goal is to see if the drug is safe for people and can successfully fight the cancer. Doctors will combine this drug with other medicines that are typically used to treat this cancer. The combined treatment will vary for different groups of patients, depending on factors like their specific type of cancer or their overall health. Some patients will be given epcoritamab on its own, while others will receive it with other cancer medicines. The study has two parts. The first part is to find a safe dose of the drug. The second part is to determine how well this drug helps in treating the cancer. Side effects will be closely monitored during the study.

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  • Investigating new treatment method for specific head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    This clinical trial is focused on evaluating the safety and efficacy of a new treatment for patients with a specific type of head and neck cancer caused by Human Papilloma Virus 16 (HPV16) and characterized by the presence of the PD-L1 protein. The treatment involves a combination of a novel drug, BNT113, and a known drug, pembrolizumab. The primary objective is to determine whether this combination is more effective than pembrolizumab alone in assisting the body’s immune system in fighting the cancer. The trial is divided into two parts. In the initial phase, the focus is on assessing the safety of the new drug combination. Subsequently, in the second phase, patients will be randomly assigned to receive either the new combination or pembrolizumab alone. The trial aims to compare the outcomes of the two groups, evaluating tumor response (whether tumors shrink, remain the same, or grow) and monitoring any potential side effects resulting from the treatment.

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See more clinical trials in other cities in France:

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