Clinical trials located in

Marseille

Marseille city is located in France. Currently, 20 clinical trials are being conducted in this city.

Marseille, France’s oldest city, was founded by Greek sailors in 600 BC. Nestled by the Mediterranean, it boasts the vibrant Vieux-Port, famed for its fish market. The city’s multicultural tapestry is reflected in its diverse neighborhoods and culinary scenes. Marseille is also the gateway to the Calanques, a stunning national park of dramatic cliffs and azure waters. The Notre-Dame de la Garde basilica, perched on a hilltop, offers panoramic views of this dynamic city, which inspired the French national anthem, “La Marseillaise.”

  • CT-EU-00121228

    Study of INBRX-109 for patients with unresectable or metastatic conventional chondrosarcoma

    Conventional chondrosarcoma is a type of cancer that affects the bones. This clinical trial focuses on evaluating a new treatment for patients with unresectable (inoperable) or metastatic (spread to other parts of the body) conventional chondrosarcoma. The therapy being tested is called INBRX-109. INBRX-109 is an experimental drug, specifically a humanized antibody that targets a protein called death receptor 5 (DR5). The study aims to determine whether INBRX-109 can help patients who have this type of bone cancer.

    In this study, participants will be randomly assigned to one of two groups: one group will receive INBRX-109, and the other will receive a placebo. Neither the participants nor the researchers will know who is receiving the actual drug and who is receiving the placebo. This is known as a double-blind study. Participants will receive their assigned treatment through an intravenous infusion every three weeks. If the disease progresses, those in the placebo group will be allowed to switch to the INBRX-109 treatment.

    The primary goal of the study is to see how well INBRX-109 works in preventing the cancer from getting worse. The study will also look at overall survival rates, how long any responses to the treatment last, and the quality of life of the participants during the study. Safety and tolerability of INBRX-109 will also be evaluated by monitoring for any side effects. Participants will have regular visits and tests to check on their condition and the effects of the treatment. This clinical trial offers a potential new treatment option for patients with difficult-to-treat chondrosarcoma, aiming to improve their outcomes and quality of life.

    • INBRX-109
    • placebo
  • Study on the effectiveness and safety of DMX-200 for FSGS patients using ARB

    Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a rare kidney disease where some parts of the kidneys become scarred, leading to kidney damage and protein loss in urine. This study involves a therapy using an experimental drug named DMX-200 (also known as repagermanium), which, when taken with a type of medication called an Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker (ARB), aims to halt the inflammation that contributes to chronic kidney disease.

    The study is designed to assess how well DMX-200 works and how safe it is in treating people with FSGS. It will compare the effects of DMX-200 with a placebo over a period of 104 weeks (about 2 years). Patients will be given either DMX-200 in capsule form to take twice daily or a placebo. Given the rarity of FSGS, the study will include both adults and adolescents aged 12 to 17 years.

    The study will start with a screening period to ensure all necessary assessments are completed. This will be followed by the main treatment phase, lasting 104 weeks. After this, there will be a 4-week follow-up period without treatment to observe any changes. Patients who complete this double-blind period and might benefit from continued treatment will enter an open-label extension phase. During this phase, participants will receive DMX-200 for an additional 2 years, also followed by a 4-week off-treatment period for further observation.

    The goal is to determine the effectiveness and long-term safety of DMX-200 for treating FSGS. The study aims to improve understanding and develop new treatments for this challenging kidney condition.

    • DMX-200
    • placebo
  • Testing BI 764198 for Kidney Disease (FSGS): A 4-Month Study

    This study is focused on individuals with a kind of kidney disease called Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). The purpose is to see if a drug named BI 764198 can improve kidney health for people with FSGS. There will be three different doses of BI 764198 tested in the study.

    Participants in the study will be divided into four groups randomly. Three groups will receive different doses of BI 764198, and one group will receive a placebo. The study will last about four months. For approximately three months, participants will take a BI 764198 capsule or placebo capsule daily.

    Participants will visit the study site around ten times. It is possible to participate from home, in which case a research nurse will visit for the study visits. Kidney health will be checked by analyzing urine samples that participants collect at home. The results will be compared between the different groups at the end of the study. Throughout the study, doctors will also regularly monitor the general health of participants.

    • BI 764198
    • placebo
  • Study of Elafibranor in the treatment of adult patients with Primary Biliary Cholangitis (PBC)

    The clinical trial is aimed at adult patients with confirmed primary cholangitis (PBC). Patients with this condition have an inadequate response or intolerance to ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a drug used to treat PBC.

    Primary cholangitis is a disease that slowly progresses and leads to damage to the bile ducts in the liver. This causes a build-up of bile acids, which further damages the liver. As the disease progresses, scarring of the liver may develop (cirrhosis). PBC is also associated with numerous symptoms, such as itching and fatigue, and may lead to the need for a liver transplant.

    The study evaluates the effectiveness and safety of a drug called elafibranor at a dose of 80 mg daily. The study will compare elafibranor with a placebo, an inactive substance administered for control purposes. The main goal of the study is to test the effectiveness of elafibranor. The safety of long-term use of this medicine and its effect on symptoms such as itching and fatigue will also be checked.

    • Elafibranor
  • Study on Alogabat for Children and Teens with Angelman Syndrome

    This study is investigating a medication called Alogabat for children and adolescents aged 5-17 years who have Angelman Syndrome with a specific genetic deletion. The research will explore how different doses of Alogabat affect the body by measuring its concentration over time and observing any changes in brain activity and safety outcomes. The study includes several phases where doses are adjusted based on early results. This research aims to determine Alogabat’s effectiveness in treating symptoms of Angelman Syndrome in younger populations.

    • Alogabat
  • Study on the safety and effects of Vonafexor in patients with Alport Syndrome

    This study focuses on Alport syndrome, a genetic disorder affecting the kidneys. The therapy being tested is Vonafexor, a medication identified as EYP001a. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety of Vonafexor and its effects on kidney function in patients with Alport syndrome who are at risk of disease progression.

    The study involves a single group of patients who will receive escalating doses of Vonafexor over a 24-week treatment period, followed by a 12-week follow-up period. The main goals are to assess the safety of the drug and observe changes in kidney function and other renal biomarkers.

    • Vonafexor
  • Long-term safety and efficacy study of PTC518 for Huntington’s disease

    This study focuses on Huntington’s Disease and evaluates the long-term safety and effectiveness of the drug PTC518. Participants, who have previously completed related study phases, will continue taking PTC518 in doses of 5, 10, or 20 milligrams. The study aims to monitor the safety of long-term use and assess how the drug impacts biological markers and symptoms of the disease over a period of 30 months. This is an extension study where all participants will receive the active drug, ensuring continuous monitoring and evaluation of its effects.

    • PTC518
  • Study of ustekinumab and guselkumab in young patients with juvenile psoriatic arthritis

    This here clinical trial is aimin’ to study two different medicines, ustekinumab and guselkumab, for treatin’ a condition called juvenile psoriatic arthritis. This is a type of arthritis that affects young’uns and causes joint pain, swellin’, and stiffness.

    The study will have two groups, one group takin’ ustekinumab and the other takin’ guselkumab. These medicines work by targetin’ certain proteins in the body that cause inflammation, which is the root cause of the arthritis symptoms.

    The main goal of the study is to see how well these medicines work in reducin’ the symptoms of juvenile psoriatic arthritis, like joint pain and swellin’. The study will also look at how the body handles these medicines and if they cause any side effects.

    The study will last for about a year and a half, with regular check-ups and assessments to monitor the participants’ progress.

    • Ustekinumab
    • Guselkumab
  • Study assessing the effectiveness of Tebentafusp administered alone and in combination with Pembrolizumab in the treatment of advanced melanoma

    The aim of this study is to test new treatments for people with advanced skin melanoma that does not respond well to other therapies. The main focus was on a new experimental drug called tebentafusp, which is a special type of protein that helps the body’s immune system recognize and attack cancer cells.

    The study divided patients into three different groups. One group will receive tebentafusp alone. Another group will receive tebentafusp in combination with another immunotherapy drug called pembrolizumab. The third group will receive the treatment that the doctor thinks is best for the patient – this could be another experimental drug, standard therapy, or simply supportive care.

    Scientists are primarily focusing on the effectiveness of these treatments in shrinking tumors and extending patient survival. They will also monitor closely for any side effects to make sure the treatment is safe. The study is expected to last about two years and will include frequent check-ins to monitor patient responses.

    • Tebentafusp
    • Pembrolizumab
  • To evaluate the effectiveness of nivolumab used alone and in combination with HBI-8000 in the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma

    This is a study comparing two treatment options for patients with melanoma that cannot be surgically removed or has spread to other parts of the body. One treatment option is an investigational drug called Tucidinostat (HBI-8000) taken by mouth twice a week in combination with an approved drug called nivolumab given by intravenous infusion. Another option is a placebo taken orally twice a week, also in combination with nivolumab given by intravenous infusion.

    The primary goal of the study is to determine whether the combination of HBI-8000 and nivolumab is more effective than nivolumab alone in shrinking the tumor or preventing further tumor progression. The study will also assess the safety of the treatment combinations.

    Patients enrolled in the main study will be randomly assigned to receive either the HBI-8000 combination or a placebo combination. Treatment will continue for up to 2 years or until the cancer progresses, side effects worsen or the patient decides to withdraw from the study. The study will last up to 4 years and will include regular monitoring and follow-up visits.

    • Placebo
    • Tudicdinostat/HBI-8000
  • Safety and efficacy of pembrolizumab in combination with investigational drugs in the first-line treatment of patients with melanoma

    The aim of this study is to test new experimental treatments for melanoma, which is a type of skin cancer. The main goal is to test whether these new treatments are safe and effective when used alone or in combination with the drug pembrolizumab.

    The current study includes several different treatment groups. Some groups receive pembrolizumab in combination with other investigational drugs such as vibostolimab, quavonlimab, lenvatinib, favezelimab, or Tretynoina (ATRA). Other groups simply receive pembrolizumab alone.

    Scientists will carefully look at factors such as dose-limiting toxicities and adverse events to make sure the treatment is safe. They will also check the effectiveness of the therapy by measuring, for example, the objective response rate, which shows whether tumors are shrinking or disappearing.

    • Tretynoina
    • Vibostolimab
    • Quavonlimab
    • Favezelimab
    • Pembrolizumab
    • Lenvatinib
  • Trial of KRT-232 and Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    This here clinical trial is looking at a new drug called KRT-232 for treating chronic myeloid leukemia, which is a type of blood cancer. The study aims to see if KRT-232, when taken along with other approved drugs like dasatinib or nilotinib, can help patients whose leukemia has come back or stopped responding to those other drugs.

    KRT-232 works by blocking a protein called MDM2, which normally keeps cancer cells alive. The main goals are to find the highest safe dose of KRT-232 that can be given with dasatinib or nilotinib, and to see if the combination can get patients’ leukemia under better control.

    This is an open-label study, meaning both patients and doctors know what treatment is being given. Patients must have chronic myeloid leukemia that has relapsed or become resistant to prior treatment with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor drug like dasatinib or nilotinib.

    • KRT-232
    • Dasatinib
    • Nilotinib
  • Study of KRT-232 Combined with Ruxolitinib for Myelofibrosis Patients

    This here clinical trial is looking at a new drug called KRT-232 that’s taken by mouth. The study aims to see if combining KRT-232 with the existing drug ruxolitinib can help folks with myelofibrosis who ain’t responding well enough to just taking ruxolitinib alone.

    The main goal in the first part of the study is to find the right dose of KRT-232 to use when combined with ruxolitinib. They’ll be looking closely at any side effects to make sure the dose is safe. In the second part, they’ll check if the combination of the two drugs can shrink the size of the spleen by at least 35% after 6 months of treatment.

    • KRT-232
    • Ruxolitinib
  • Combining Azacitidine and Venetoclax for Higher-Risk Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    The AVENHIR study is an open-label clinical trial for patients with higher-risk chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, a type of blood cancer. This study will evaluate the effectiveness and safety of combining two drugs: Azacitidine and Venetoclax (also known as ABT-199). Azacitidine is a chemotherapy drug, while Venetoclax is a targeted therapy that works by blocking a specific protein in cancer cells.

    The main goals of the study are to determine the overall response rate to this drug combination, which means how many patients achieve complete remission, partial remission, or clinical benefit. The study will also closely monitor safety and any potential dose-limiting side effects during the first two treatment cycles.

    To be eligible for this study, patients must be newly diagnosed with higher-risk chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and have not received any prior treatment with hypomethylating agents like Azacitidine.

    • Venetoclax
  • Study Comparing Asciminib and Nilotinib for Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    This study examines the effects and tolerance of two drugs, asciminib and nilotinib, for treating a specific type of leukemia called Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in its chronic phase. The participants are adults who have been newly diagnosed and have not received previous treatment for this condition. They will be randomly assigned to receive either asciminib or nilotinib. The study aims to see which drug is better tolerated and how effective they are. Throughout the study, participants will be monitored for any side effects and the progress of their treatment until they either experience significant side effects, the disease progresses, or they decide to stop the treatment. Follow-up checks will also be conducted after the treatment ends.

    • Asciminib
    • Nilotinib
  • Study of TL-895 Combined with Ruxolitinib for Myelofibrosis Treatment

    This here clinical trial is studying a new experimental drug called TL-895 for the treatment of myelofibrosis. TL-895 works by blocking certain proteins called tyrosine kinases that are involved in the growth of cancer cells. The study is open to folks who have myelofibrosis, including primary myelofibrosis, post-polycythemia vera myelofibrosis, or post-essential thrombocythemia myelofibrosis.

    Participants in the study will take TL-895 along with another drug called ruxolitinib, which is already approved for treating myelofibrosis. Ruxolitinib, also known as Jakafi or Jakavi, works by blocking different proteins called Janus kinases that are also involved in cancer growth.

    The main goal of the study is to find the best dose of TL-895 to use with ruxolitinib that is both safe and effective. In the first part, different doses of TL-895 will be tested to determine the highest dose that can be tolerated without causing too many side effects. Then in the second part, the recommended dose will be given to all participants, and the researchers will measure how well the combination of drugs reduces spleen size after 24 weeks of treatment.

    So in a nutshell, this study aims to test a new targeted therapy for myelofibrosis by combining it with an existing approved drug, with the hope of improving treatment outcomes for patients with this serious blood disorder.

    • TL-895
    • Ruxolitinib
  • Exploring a new treatment combination for rheumatoid arthritis: baricitinib plus anti-TNF

    This clinical trial is focused on finding a more effective treatment for people with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) who haven’t responded well to previous therapies. The study is comparing two different approaches: one group will receive a combination of baricitinib treatment and an anti-TNF therapy (adalimumab), while the other group will receive baricitinib along with a placebo. The main goal is to see which group shows a greater improvement in their RA symptoms, specifically looking for a 50% improvement in symptoms, known as an ACR 50 response, after 24 weeks from the start of the treatment.

    Baricitinib is a medication that targets certain pathways in the body’s immune system to reduce inflammation and pain in RA. Anti-TNF therapy, like adalimumab, works by blocking the action of a protein in the body that causes inflammation. By combining these two treatments, researchers hope to see a more significant improvement in RA symptoms than with baricitinib alone.

    The trial is important because it aims to provide a new option for patients with RA who have not found relief with current treatments. It’s designed to test the safety and effectiveness of using these two different types of medications together.

    • placebo
    • Adalimumab
    • Baricitinib
  • Study on Ravulizumab’s effect on Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy

    The study is looking into the effectiveness of a medication called ravulizumab for adults who have a kidney condition known as Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy (IgAN). This condition can lead to kidney damage over time, and the study aims to find out if ravulizumab can help reduce the amount of protein lost in urine—a common problem in IgAN—and slow down the decrease in kidney function.

    In this study, about 450 participants who are at a high risk of their disease getting worse will be chosen. These participants must have been on stable treatment for their IgAN for at least three months before the study starts. They will then receive either ravulizumab or a placebo, which is a treatment with no active drug, through an IV infusion based on their weight. The main goal is to see if those who receive ravulizumab have a significant improvement in their condition compared to those who receive the placebo.

    The study will have two main checkpoints. The first one, at Week 34, will check how much protein is in the urine, and the second one, at Week 106, will assess how well the kidneys are filtering waste from the blood. Additionally, a smaller group of participants with more advanced kidney issues will receive ravulizumab to further explore its effects.

    After the study ends at Week 106, participants will have the option to continue receiving ravulizumab in a follow-up period to see how long-term treatment affects their condition. This study is a chance for people with IgAN to potentially slow down their disease progression and improve their quality of life.

    • placebo
    • Ravulizumab
  • Study of belzutifan for treating advanced cancers

    This clinical trial aim is to test out a new drug called belzutifan, also known as MK-6482 or WELIREG™. It’s a pill patient can take once a day, and the main goal is to see if it can shrink or get rid of tumors in folks with certain types of cancer.

    The cancers the researchers are looking at are pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma, which are tumors that start in the adrenal glands or nervous system. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, tumors related to von Hippel-Lindau disease, advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors, and other solid tumors with certain genetic changes that involve a protein called HIF-2α, there will be also tested.

    The big thing the researchers are  keeping an eye on is the objective response rate, which means how many folks see their tumors shrink or disappear completely while taking this drug. The researchers will be watching closely for any side effects too, of course, to make sure this new medicine is safe.

    • Belzutifan

See more clinical trials in other cities in France:

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