Clinical trials located in

Luebeck

Luebeck city is located in Germany. Currently, 4 clinical trials are being conducted in this city.

  • CT-EU-00116719

    To evaluate the effectiveness of nivolumab used alone and in combination with HBI-8000 in the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma

    This is a study comparing two treatment options for patients with melanoma that cannot be surgically removed or has spread to other parts of the body. One treatment option is an investigational drug called Tucidinostat (HBI-8000) taken by mouth twice a week in combination with an approved drug called nivolumab given by intravenous infusion. Another option is a placebo taken orally twice a week, also in combination with nivolumab given by intravenous infusion.

    The primary goal of the study is to determine whether the combination of HBI-8000 and nivolumab is more effective than nivolumab alone in shrinking the tumor or preventing further tumor progression. The study will also assess the safety of the treatment combinations.

    Patients enrolled in the main study will be randomly assigned to receive either the HBI-8000 combination or a placebo combination. Treatment will continue for up to 2 years or until the cancer progresses, side effects worsen or the patient decides to withdraw from the study. The study will last up to 4 years and will include regular monitoring and follow-up visits.

    • Placebo
    • Tudicdinostat/HBI-8000
  • Study on combining two drugs – Fianlimab and Cemiplimab in patients with previously untreated melanoma

    This study examines two drugs, fianlimab and cemiplimab, given together for the treatment of melanoma. The main goal is to see how effective this drug combination is in treating melanoma compared with pembrolizumab, which is already approved for the treatment of melanoma in adults. The study will also look at whether there are any differences in the effects of these experimental drugs in adolescents and adults.

    Scientists also want to learn about other key issues: what side effects may occur from taking these experimental drugs, how much of the drugs enter the bloodstream over time, and whether the body produces antibodies to the drugs that could make them less effective or cause side effects. They will also check whether taking medications improves patients’ quality of life. Fianlimab and cemiplimab will be administered by intravenous infusion, and pembrolizumab will be administered by intravenous infusion.

    • placebo
    • Fianlimab
    • Cemiplimab
    • Pembrolizumab
  • Study Comparing Asciminib and Nilotinib for Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    This study examines the effects and tolerance of two drugs, asciminib and nilotinib, for treating a specific type of leukemia called Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in its chronic phase. The participants are adults who have been newly diagnosed and have not received previous treatment for this condition. They will be randomly assigned to receive either asciminib or nilotinib. The study aims to see which drug is better tolerated and how effective they are. Throughout the study, participants will be monitored for any side effects and the progress of their treatment until they either experience significant side effects, the disease progresses, or they decide to stop the treatment. Follow-up checks will also be conducted after the treatment ends.

    • Asciminib
    • Nilotinib
  • Evaluating Ianalumab for active Sjogren’s syndrome

    The NEPTUNUS-2 study is a significant research project aimed at exploring the effectiveness and safety of a medication called ianalumab (VAY736) for individuals suffering from active Sjogren’s Syndrome. This study is designed as a three-arm, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, which means participants will be randomly assigned to one of three groups: two will receive ianalumab at different intervals, and one will receive a placebo, with neither the participants nor the researchers knowing which group participants are in to ensure unbiased results.

    The main goal of this study is to determine how well ianalumab can improve the symptoms of Sjogren’s Syndrome compared to a placebo. This will be measured by the change in a specific score called the EULAR Sjögren Syndrome Disease Activity Index (ESSDAI) from the start of the study to week 48. The ESSDAI score helps doctors understand how active the disease is, with a higher score indicating more active disease. A decrease in this score over time would suggest an improvement in the condition.

    Participants in this study will receive ianalumab injections either once a month or every three months, depending on the group they are assigned to. The study emphasizes not only the potential benefits of ianalumab in treating Sjogren’s Syndrome but also its safety and tolerability, ensuring that the treatment is not only effective but also safe for patients.

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