Clinical trials located in

Hannover

Hannover city is located in Germany. Currently, 8 clinical trials are being conducted in this city.

  • CT-EU-00121056

    Testing BI 764198 for Kidney Disease (FSGS): A 4-Month Study

    This study is focused on individuals with a kind of kidney disease called Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). The purpose is to see if a drug named BI 764198 can improve kidney health for people with FSGS. There will be three different doses of BI 764198 tested in the study.

    Participants in the study will be divided into four groups randomly. Three groups will receive different doses of BI 764198, and one group will receive a placebo. The study will last about four months. For approximately three months, participants will take a BI 764198 capsule or placebo capsule daily.

    Participants will visit the study site around ten times. It is possible to participate from home, in which case a research nurse will visit for the study visits. Kidney health will be checked by analyzing urine samples that participants collect at home. The results will be compared between the different groups at the end of the study. Throughout the study, doctors will also regularly monitor the general health of participants.

    • BI 764198
    • placebo
  • Study of Barzolvolimab (CDX-0159) in Adult Patients with Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    This clinical study involves patients with Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE), a condition where a type of white blood cell, called eosinophils, builds up in the lining of the esophagus. This can lead to difficulty swallowing and other issues. The therapy being tested is barzolvolimab (CDX-0159).

    The goal of the study is to test the effectiveness and safety of barzolvolimab in adults with active EoE. There are two main groups in this study: one will receive barzolvolimab, and the other will receive a placebo, followed by barzolvolimab.

    Participants will receive treatment through subcutaneous (under the skin) injections every four weeks for 24 weeks. In the barzolvolimab group, patients will get 300 mg of the medication from the start. In the other group, patients will receive a placebo for the first 16 weeks and then switch to barzolvolimab for the remaining 8 weeks.

    The study will look at changes in the number of eosinophils and other cells in the esophagus, as well as symptoms like difficulty swallowing. Side effects and other health changes will be monitored throughout the study.

    • Placebo
    • barzolvolimab
  • Study on the effectiveness and safety of Ianalumab for treating Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    This clinical trial is designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a drug called ianalumab in patients with warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (wAIHA) who have not responded to at least one previous treatment. The study aims to determine if ianalumab can induce and maintain a durable hemoglobin response compared to a placebo.

    Participants will be randomly assigned to receive one of two different doses of ianalumab or a placebo. If a participant assigned to the placebo group does not respond to the treatment, they may be given ianalumab in an open-label manner, meaning both the participant and the doctor will know they are receiving the drug.

    The investigational treatment will be administered through an intravenous (i.v.) infusion. During the study, participants will have regular visits every other week during the treatment period and primary endpoint follow-up period. For safety monitoring, visits will occur monthly for the first 20 weeks after the last dose and then quarterly for up to two years. If a participant achieves a durable response, additional monthly visits for efficacy will continue for the first two years after the last dose, followed by quarterly visits until the loss of response or the end of the study, which could be up to 39 months after the last participant is randomized.

    The primary goal is to see if ianalumab can achieve a durable hemoglobin response, defined as a hemoglobin level of at least 10 g/dL and an increase of at least 2 g/dL from baseline for a period of at least eight consecutive weeks between weeks 9 and 25, without the need for rescue medication or prohibited treatment.

    This study offers hope for patients with wAIHA who have not found success with other treatments, providing a potential new option to manage their condition.

    • placebo
  • To evaluate a combination of 3 different drugs versus 2 other drugs in the treatment of patients with melanoma

    This study compares two different approaches to treating advanced melanoma, a type of skin cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. This study is specifically aimed at patients with a gene mutation called BRAF who have previously received treatment with drugs such as nivolumab or pembrolizumab.

    One therapeutic approach involves taking three study drugs: pembrolizumab administered intravenously every 3 weeks, along with encorafenib and binimetinib taken orally daily at home. The second approach involves taking two study drugs: ipilimumab and nivolumab administered intravenously every 3 weeks for the first 4 doses, followed by nivolumab alone every 4 weeks. Both treatments will last for approximately 2 years, but there is no time limit for treatment with encorafenib and binimetinib.

    The research team will closely monitor the patients’ health during regular clinic visits to see how they are responding to treatment. The main goal is to determine which treatment method is more effective in shrinking or eliminating melanoma tumors.

    • Nivolumab
    • Ipilimumab
    • Binimetinib
    • Encorafenib
    • Pembrolizumab
  • Study Comparing Asciminib and Nilotinib for Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    This study examines the effects and tolerance of two drugs, asciminib and nilotinib, for treating a specific type of leukemia called Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in its chronic phase. The participants are adults who have been newly diagnosed and have not received previous treatment for this condition. They will be randomly assigned to receive either asciminib or nilotinib. The study aims to see which drug is better tolerated and how effective they are. Throughout the study, participants will be monitored for any side effects and the progress of their treatment until they either experience significant side effects, the disease progresses, or they decide to stop the treatment. Follow-up checks will also be conducted after the treatment ends.

    • Asciminib
    • Nilotinib
  • Evaluating Ianalumab for active Sjogren’s syndrome

    The NEPTUNUS-2 study is a significant research project aimed at exploring the effectiveness and safety of a medication called ianalumab (VAY736) for individuals suffering from active Sjogren’s Syndrome. This study is designed as a three-arm, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, which means participants will be randomly assigned to one of three groups: two will receive ianalumab at different intervals, and one will receive a placebo, with neither the participants nor the researchers knowing which group participants are in to ensure unbiased results.

    The main goal of this study is to determine how well ianalumab can improve the symptoms of Sjogren’s Syndrome compared to a placebo. This will be measured by the change in a specific score called the EULAR Sjögren Syndrome Disease Activity Index (ESSDAI) from the start of the study to week 48. The ESSDAI score helps doctors understand how active the disease is, with a higher score indicating more active disease. A decrease in this score over time would suggest an improvement in the condition.

    Participants in this study will receive ianalumab injections either once a month or every three months, depending on the group they are assigned to. The study emphasizes not only the potential benefits of ianalumab in treating Sjogren’s Syndrome but also its safety and tolerability, ensuring that the treatment is not only effective but also safe for patients.

  • Comparison of zibotentan/dapagliflozin with dapagliflozin alone in the treatment of chronic kidney disease with high proteinuria

    The study aims to understand how to better treat people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and high proteinuria. This study is in its third phase and involves multiple centers where participants will be closely monitored. The main goal is to compare the effectiveness, safety, and how well participants tolerate a combination treatment of zibotentan/dapagliflozin versus dapagliflozin alone.

    During this study, participants will be randomly assigned to one of two groups. One group will receive the combination of zibotentan and dapagliflozin, while the other group will receive only dapagliflozin. Both treatments aim to slow down the decline in kidney function, which is a major concern for people with CKD and high proteinuria. The key measure of success for this study is the change in eGFR from baseline, which is a test used to check how well the kidneys are working, specifically by measuring the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). This will be assessed at the 24-month mark of the study.

    This research is crucial because it could lead to better treatment options for those suffering from CKD and high proteinuria, potentially improving their quality of life and health outcomes.

    • Zibotentan/Dapagliflozin
    • Dapagliflozin
  • Study on Ravulizumab’s effect on Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy

    The study is looking into the effectiveness of a medication called ravulizumab for adults who have a kidney condition known as Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy (IgAN). This condition can lead to kidney damage over time, and the study aims to find out if ravulizumab can help reduce the amount of protein lost in urine—a common problem in IgAN—and slow down the decrease in kidney function.

    In this study, about 450 participants who are at a high risk of their disease getting worse will be chosen. These participants must have been on stable treatment for their IgAN for at least three months before the study starts. They will then receive either ravulizumab or a placebo, which is a treatment with no active drug, through an IV infusion based on their weight. The main goal is to see if those who receive ravulizumab have a significant improvement in their condition compared to those who receive the placebo.

    The study will have two main checkpoints. The first one, at Week 34, will check how much protein is in the urine, and the second one, at Week 106, will assess how well the kidneys are filtering waste from the blood. Additionally, a smaller group of participants with more advanced kidney issues will receive ravulizumab to further explore its effects.

    After the study ends at Week 106, participants will have the option to continue receiving ravulizumab in a follow-up period to see how long-term treatment affects their condition. This study is a chance for people with IgAN to potentially slow down their disease progression and improve their quality of life.

    • placebo
    • Ravulizumab

See more clinical trials in other cities in Germany:

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