Clinical trials located in

Canterbury

Canterbury city is located in United Kingdom. Currently, 9 clinical trials are being conducted in this city.

Canterbury, a historic English cathedral city, lies at the heart of the City of Canterbury, a local government district of Kent, in the South East region of England. It boasts the famous Canterbury Cathedral, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, which is the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury, leader of the Church of England. Founded by the Romans as Durovernum Cantiacorum, Canterbury’s rich history is also marked by Geoffrey Chaucer’s “The Canterbury Tales,” a cornerstone of English literature. The city’s ancient walls, originally built by the Romans, encircle its medieval center, blending history with the vibrancy of modern life.

  • CT-EU-00119858

    A Study of Obexelimab for treating Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia


    Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (wAIHA) is a condition where the body’s immune system attacks and destroys its own red blood cells. This study will examine whether obexelimab can help treat people with wAIHA. Obexelimab is a special type of treatment called a monoclonal antibody, which can target and potentially reduce the activity of some immune cells involved in this disease.

    Study participants will go through different stages. The first stage is a Safety and Dose Confirmation Run-In Period (SRP) lasting for six months. During this time, all participants will receive obexelimab through injections under the skin. This is followed by the Randomized Control Period (RCP), which also lasts for six months. In this stage, participants will be randomly divided into two groups: one group will continue to receive obexelimab, while the other group will receive a placebo.

    After these initial periods, participants will have the chance to continue receiving obexelimab in an Open Label Extension (OLE) period lasting up to a year. Throughout the study, participants will visit the study site for regular checks to ensure the treatment’s effectiveness and safety.

    • Obexelimab
  • Comparing treatments for new Large B-cell lymphoma patients

    The trial aims to analyze and compare two drug treatments for people who have a large B-Cell Lymphoma, a kind of cancer that affects a certain type of white blood cells, and have not yet started their treatment. The first treatment is a combination of glofitamab, polatuzumab vedotin, and other common drugs used for this condition: rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and prednisone. The second treatment is the same, but doesn’t include the glofitamab. The goal is to understand which treatment is more effective and safer for the patient.

    • Prednisone
    • Polatuzumab vedotin
    • Glofitamab
    • Doxorubicin
    • Cyclophosphamide
    • Rituximab
  • Comparison of different treatments for follicular lymphoma

    This study involves comparing two treatments for a condition known as follicular or marginal zone lymphoma, both of which are types of cancer affecting lymph cells. The first treatment combines zanubrutinib with an antibody called Anti-CD20, while the second treatment involves lenalidomide and rituximab. These treatments are intended for patients who have not responded or have stopped responding to conventional treatment. One of the primary objectives of the study is to determine which treatment is more effective in preventing the cancer from progressing, referred to as progression-free survival. Additionally, the study aims to assess the impact of these treatments on the patients’ quality of life, evaluating various aspects through questionnaires related to physical and emotional well-being, symptoms, and the ability to perform normal activities.

    • Zanubrutinib
    • Obinutuzumab
    • Lenalidomide
    • Rituximab
  • Study on dazostinag & pembrolizumab for advanced solid tumors

    The purpose of this study is to test a new drug called dazostinag. A study is being conducted to see whether this drug is helpful in adults with advanced forms of solid cancer. Some people are given dazostinag alone, while others are given it with another medicine called pembrolizumab. Scientists’ focus here is on finding out whether these drugs cause any side effects, and finding out what the maximum dose is that people can take without serious side effects. The study consists of two parts, including a dose escalation phase and a dose escalation phase. In the first part, the dose of dazostinag will be gradually increased, given alone or in combination with pembrolizumab. In the second part, Dazostinag will be tested with pembrolizumab and other anticancer drugs. This section will focus on patients with specific cancers that are difficult to remove or have spread to other parts of the body.

    • Dazostinag
    • Platinum
    • Pembrolizumab
    • 5-Fluorouracil
  • Study on Tolebrutinib’s ability to delay disability progression in multiple sclerosis

    This is a study that involves a specific type of multiple sclerosis (MS) called primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS). In this study, a drug called SAR442168, also known as Tolebrutinib, will be tested against a placebo. The main purpose of the study is to see if this drug can slow down the progression of disability in PPMS. The researchers will also look at the drug’s effect on clinical markers, brain images (MRI), thinking abilities, physical function, and quality of life. They will also consider the safety and tolerability of this drug. How long each person will take the drug can vary, but it will be somewhere between 12 and 60 months.

    • Tolebrutinib/SAR442168
  • Exploring physical activity and joint health in Haemophilia A patients using efanesoctocog alfa

    This study is called FREEDOM, and it’s investigating how physical activity and joint health are impacted in people aged 12 and above who have severe Haemophilia A, a bleeding condition. These people are treated with a drug called efanesoctocog alfa once a week over a two-year period. Participants will wear a device that tracks their activity, and they will also keep an electronic diary recording any bleeding, pain, injuries they have and how much of the drug they’re taking. The study is mainly comparing how physical activity changes over the two-year period, but it’ll also examine changes in joint health, occurrences of bleeds, injuries, and pain, along with the general safety of the drug.

    • Efanesoctocog alfa
  • A study on the treatment of multiple myeloma using a combination of innovative and standard drugs

    This clinical trial is dedicated to evaluating the long-term effectiveness and safety of two novel drug combinations, Teclistamab with Daratumumab and Lenalidomide (Tec-DR) and Talquetamab with Daratumumab and Lenalidomide (Tal-DR), for patients newly diagnosed with multiple myeloma. The study is designed as a randomized, parallel assignment trial, involving about 1590 participants. By comparing these new treatments against the standard combination of Daratumumab, Lenalidomide, and Dexamethasone (DRd), the research aims to identify the most effective treatment protocol for managing this type of cancer, potentially leading to new standard care practices for multiple myeloma.

    • Talquetamab
    • Teclistamab
    • Dexamethasone
    • Lenalidomide
    • Daratumumab
  • Study of new drugs in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    This clinical trial focuses on improving treatment strategies for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in a diverse age group, from infants to young adults up to 45 years old. The study combines standard treatments with new drugs, for example, Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Blinatumomab. The trial aims to tailor treatment to individual patient needs and reduce toxicity while maintaining treatment quality. By carefully monitoring event- and disease-free survival rates, as well as minimal residual disease responses, the trial aims to improve the standard of care for ALL and improve both survival outcomes and patient quality of life.

    • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin
    • 6-tioguanine
    • Blinatumomab
    • Imatinib
    • Dexamethasone
    • Vincristine
    • Doxorubicin
  • Exploring sacituzumab govitecan for HER2-negative breast cancer care

    This study is evaluating a new treatment for patients with a certain type of breast cancer (HER2-negative) who have not had a complete response to initial chemotherapy. Participants are randomly assigned to receive the investigational drug sacituzumab govitecan or a treatment of their physician’s choice, which may be another type of chemotherapy with capecitabinalub, carboplatin or cisplatin. The study is designed to compare the effectiveness of these approaches in preventing cancer recurrence. Patients may also receive hormone therapy if needed. Patients’ safety and response to treatment are being closely monitored throughout the study.

    • Sacituzumab govitecan
    • Carboplatin
    • Cisplatin
    • Capecitabine

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