Clinical trials located in

Brighton and Hove

Brighton and Hove city is located in United Kingdom. Currently, 9 clinical trials are being conducted in this city.

Brighton and Hove, a vibrant city on the south coast of England, is renowned for its diverse communities, rich history, and cultural heritage. It became a single city in 2000, merging the separate towns of Brighton and Hove. Famous for its iconic pebble beach, historic Brighton Pier, and the Royal Pavilion with its Indian and Chinese-inspired architecture, the city is a hub of arts, festivals, and nightlife. It also boasts the UK’s first Green Party MP, reflecting its progressive and environmentally conscious ethos. Brighton and Hove is a significant part of the UK’s LGBTQ+ history, hosting one of the country’s largest Pride festivals.

  • CT-EU-00057221

    Testing relacorilant and nab-paclitaxel for various types of cancer

    The study is being conducted to investigate a new treatment for advanced ovarian, peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer that has been unresponsive to standard treatment. The focus is on assessing whether a specific combination of drugs (Relacorilant and Nab-Paclitaxel) is more effective than using Nab-Paclitaxel alone. The primary objective is to determine if this combination can prolong the period before cancer progression without causing excessive side effects, in comparison to the use of Nab-Paclitaxel alone. Another goal is to evaluate whether the treatment can lead to a reduction in the size of the cancer and prevent further progression for an extended duration. Patients will undergo regular assessments to monitor disease progression and survival. Criteria such as RECIST, a measurement system, and a blood test checking for the presence of CA-125, a substance elevated in cancer patients, will be employed to assess disease progress.

    • Relacorilant
    • Nab-paclitaxel
  • Comparison of different treatments for follicular lymphoma

    This study involves comparing two treatments for a condition known as follicular or marginal zone lymphoma, both of which are types of cancer affecting lymph cells. The first treatment combines zanubrutinib with an antibody called Anti-CD20, while the second treatment involves lenalidomide and rituximab. These treatments are intended for patients who have not responded or have stopped responding to conventional treatment. One of the primary objectives of the study is to determine which treatment is more effective in preventing the cancer from progressing, referred to as progression-free survival. Additionally, the study aims to assess the impact of these treatments on the patients’ quality of life, evaluating various aspects through questionnaires related to physical and emotional well-being, symptoms, and the ability to perform normal activities.

    • Zanubrutinib
    • Obinutuzumab
    • Lenalidomide
    • Rituximab
  • Study on dazostinag & pembrolizumab for advanced solid tumors

    The purpose of this study is to test a new drug called dazostinag. A study is being conducted to see whether this drug is helpful in adults with advanced forms of solid cancer. Some people are given dazostinag alone, while others are given it with another medicine called pembrolizumab. Scientists’ focus here is on finding out whether these drugs cause any side effects, and finding out what the maximum dose is that people can take without serious side effects. The study consists of two parts, including a dose escalation phase and a dose escalation phase. In the first part, the dose of dazostinag will be gradually increased, given alone or in combination with pembrolizumab. In the second part, Dazostinag will be tested with pembrolizumab and other anticancer drugs. This section will focus on patients with specific cancers that are difficult to remove or have spread to other parts of the body.

    • Dazostinag
    • Platinum
    • Pembrolizumab
    • 5-Fluorouracil
  • Study on new immunotherapy and its effect on genital herpes

    This study is about a new therapy being tried out on people aged 18-60 who either don’t have herpes, or who suffer from genital herpes. It seeks to check how people’s bodies are reacting to a new treatment meant to fight herpes simplex virus (HSV), whether it’s safe, and if it causes the body to develop an immune defense against the virus. Firstly, they will check how the new vaccine works on people aged 18-40 who don’t have herpes. Then they will do the same tests on men and women aged 18-60 who are suffering from genital herpes. Some of the side effects from the treatment might involve pain, redness, swelling, fever, fatigue, headache, and joint or muscle pain. They will measure fever using a thermometer placed in the mouth. In the study, they will record any unexpected side effects or ones that occur seven days after each treatment. These could be symptoms or illnesses that require a visit to a doctor or the hospital.

    • Non-adjuvanted HSV
    • HSVTI_F2
    • HSVTI_F1
  • Breast cancer treatment study: camizestrant vs. standard therapy

    This study is looking at a new drug called camizestrant for adults with a certain type of early breast cancer (ER+/HER2-). It compares camizestrant with standard endocrine therapies like tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors in patients who have already received 2–5 years of endocrine therapy. The study’s focus is on preventing cancer recurrence over 60 months. About 4300 participants are involved, and the trial features an open-label design, meaning everyone knows which treatment they are receiving. The main goal is to check how well the camizestrant works in comparison to standard treatments.

    • camizestrant
    • Anastrozole
    • Letrozole
    • Exemestane
    • tamoxifen
  • Study of the effects of Durvalumab and Domvanalimab on non-small cell lung cancer

    This study looks at two drugs – Durvalumab and Domvanalimab – and how they may help people with a type of lung cancer that cannot be removed by surgery. These medicines are given to patients after special treatment combining chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The goal is to find out whether these drugs provide benefits and are safe to use. During the trial, patients will be given the real drug or a placebo (a substance that has no therapeutic effect), without knowing which one they will receive. The study will measure how long it takes for the disease to worsen, how long people live and how many people respond positively to treatment. This clinical trial is testing the effectiveness of Durvalumab and Domvanalimab – two drugs – in the treatment of stage III lung cancer that cannot be surgically removed. After undergoing chemotherapy and radiation therapy, participants will be given these drugs to assess their safety. The study is double-blind, meaning neither participants nor researchers know who is receiving the actual drug and who is receiving the placebo. The study will monitor whether the cancer gets worse and what the rate of positive reactions to the drugs is. A study is being conducted with two drugs, Durvalumab and Domvanalimab, for patients with advanced forms of lung cancer that cannot be treated with surgery. After undergoing combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy, participants receive these drugs. The study was designed so that neither the patient nor the doctor knew whether the correct drug or a placebo was being administered. The time until the disease worsens, how long participants live and the number of patients who see improvement with the drugs will be measured.

    • Domvanalimab
    • Durvalumab
  • Study of new drugs in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    This clinical trial focuses on improving treatment strategies for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in a diverse age group, from infants to young adults up to 45 years old. The study combines standard treatments with new drugs, for example, Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Blinatumomab. The trial aims to tailor treatment to individual patient needs and reduce toxicity while maintaining treatment quality. By carefully monitoring event- and disease-free survival rates, as well as minimal residual disease responses, the trial aims to improve the standard of care for ALL and improve both survival outcomes and patient quality of life.

    • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin
    • 6-tioguanine
    • Blinatumomab
    • Imatinib
    • Dexamethasone
    • Vincristine
    • Doxorubicin
  • Exploring sacituzumab govitecan for HER2-negative breast cancer care

    This study is evaluating a new treatment for patients with a certain type of breast cancer (HER2-negative) who have not had a complete response to initial chemotherapy. Participants are randomly assigned to receive the investigational drug sacituzumab govitecan or a treatment of their physician’s choice, which may be another type of chemotherapy with capecitabinalub, carboplatin or cisplatin. The study is designed to compare the effectiveness of these approaches in preventing cancer recurrence. Patients may also receive hormone therapy if needed. Patients’ safety and response to treatment are being closely monitored throughout the study.

    • Sacituzumab govitecan
    • Carboplatin
    • Cisplatin
    • Capecitabine
  • Study of a new drug in children with shortness of breath and wheezing

    This study focuses on Broncho-Vaxom (OM-85), a medication intended to assist children who frequently experience chest infections and encounter difficulties such as wheezing or shortness of breath. The trial is set up to compare three groups of kids from 6 months to 5 years old. The first group will get Broncho-Vaxom (OM-85) for a whole year, the second group will get OM-85 for three months and then a placebo for nine months, and the third will only get the placebo for a year. Observations will be conducted on the children for a year and a half to assess whether there is a reduction in chest infections while they are taking the medication.

    • Broncho-Vaxom/Bacterial Lysates/OM-85

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